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Neil Armstrong, THE Man on the Moon

The “right stuff” . . . Neil Armstrong had it. The first man to leave a mark in moondust died Saturday at age 82 from complications related to heart surgery. Armstrong was a complex man that American popular culture could never crack open. That’s a good and rare thing.

All these decades, Armstrong, the lunar Adam, has represented a code his admirers knew better than to try to crack. Not that, early on, great literary minds—besotted by the baby-faced genius—didn’t try.

Wolfe continued: “You’d ask him a question, and he would just stare at you with those pale-blue eyes of his, and you’d start to ask the question again, figuring he hadn’t understood, and— click —out of his mouth would come forth a sequence of long, quiet, perfectly formed, precisely thought-out sentences.”

So Wolfe warned against understanding Armstrong in “The Right Stuff.” And that warning was more or less heeded, somewhat miraculously, until Armstrong’s dying day. Profilers kept their mitts off him. Hollywood starlets didn’t swoop in to wreck his family. And, most mercifully of all, Carson and Merv Griffin and Dinah Shore and Ali G and Oprah didn’t demand that he couch-surf with them. — Virginia Heffernan, for Yahoo News

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July 20, 1969: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” If you were alive then and sentient enough to recognize that iconic history was being made, that quote is burned into your brain in a way that youngsters might appreciate but never fully understand. This was a moment of American pride and human exceptionalism that reminded us that even while America seemed on the verge of coming undone, we would overcome.

Rest in peace, Neil Armstrong. The eagle has landed.

texasgalt
Texas native. Conservative small businessman with 31 years experience. Government should roll back the nanny state. No country can tax its way to prosperity. The question isn't who will let me but who will stop me?

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    • A caller today on Rush had a profound bit of information about Neil Armstrong.

      CALLER: I’m one of those political consultants you like to bash all the time, but let’s get this on a lighter note. I wanted to tell you a Neil Armstrong story.
      RUSH: Okay.
      CALLER: I’ve got an autographed newspaper that says, “Man Reaches the Moon Today,” and it’s signed by Neil Armstrong. I wanted to tell you how I got it. Neil Armstrong, after he went to the moon, he did travel a little bit, and did some publicity. He actually spoke at a Chamber of Commerce dinner in Fort Myers, and my mom went to that dinner and she saved those newspapers and she got one of them signed for each one of my brothers and sisters. But, in his speech, what impressed me was, and I want to confirm what you had said earlier, in his speech to the crowd, he described what it was like to go to the moon. And my mom was telling me about this and she was just riveted by it. He said, given everything that could go wrong, they did not expect to return from that trip. They did not believe, everything that could go wrong, that they were gonna make it back. And so then when it came time for questions, somebody asked him, “Then why did you go on the mission?” Remember, he was a military man, and he said, “He considered it a sacrifice for his country.” And that just rivets me. I think about it all the time.

  1. Ditto, VB. I still remember watching it with two younger friends on a scratchy Black and White TV in their basement.

    When he was down, we jumped up and ran around the house yelling, “We beat the Reds! We beat the Reds!”

    I’ve remembered that moment of pride and excitement for the ensuing 40+ years or so. Not the ignorance of youth and a space race the import of which I couldn’t possibly have understood at the time.

    But I did understand that we had just done something remarkable. That we were Americans and exceptional. That realization fueled my life for decades even when I didn’t understand it was doing so.

    Amazing how a life I never interacted with personally still was able to change my life.

    RIP Neil …

    • A caller today on Rush had a profound bit of information about Neil Armstrong.

      CALLER: I’m one of those political consultants you like to bash all the time, but let’s get this on a lighter note. I wanted to tell you a Neil Armstrong story.
      RUSH: Okay.
      CALLER: I’ve got an autographed newspaper that says, “Man Reaches the Moon Today,” and it’s signed by Neil Armstrong. I wanted to tell you how I got it. Neil Armstrong, after he went to the moon, he did travel a little bit, and did some publicity. He actually spoke at a Chamber of Commerce dinner in Fort Myers, and my mom went to that dinner and she saved those newspapers and she got one of them signed for each one of my brothers and sisters. But, in his speech, what impressed me was, and I want to confirm what you had said earlier, in his speech to the crowd, he described what it was like to go to the moon. And my mom was telling me about this and she was just riveted by it. He said, given everything that could go wrong, they did not expect to return from that trip. They did not believe, everything that could go wrong, that they were gonna make it back. And so then when it came time for questions, somebody asked him, “Then why did you go on the mission?” Remember, he was a military man, and he said, “He considered it a sacrifice for his country.” And that just rivets me. I think about it all the time.

  1. Ditto, VB. I still remember watching it with two younger friends on a scratchy Black and White TV in their basement.

    When he was down, we jumped up and ran around the house yelling, “We beat the Reds! We beat the Reds!”

    I’ve remembered that moment of pride and excitement for the ensuing 40+ years or so. Not the ignorance of youth and a space race the import of which I couldn’t possibly have understood at the time.

    But I did understand that we had just done something remarkable. That we were Americans and exceptional. That realization fueled my life for decades even when I didn’t understand it was doing so.

    Amazing how a life I never interacted with personally still was able to change my life.

    RIP Neil …

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