Sunday, September 19, 2021
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2012 Governor Contests

In 2010, 37 governors’ races were contested and we saw numerous news articles about them. November 2012 is only going to see 11 governors’ races contested, and we’re not going to see near the same amount of media coverage. Eight of the eleven currently have a Democrat governor. Four of the Democrat governors are running for reelection, and two of the Republican Governors are running for reelection. I expect the GOP to hold the three seats and pick up between three and five of the Democrat governorships. These victories will give the GOP between 32 and 34 of the 50 Governor seats.

Since there are only eleven races I am providing a photo and recent quotes from the eight Republican nominees and the three candidates I expect to win their primary on August 7th for Missouri and Washington, and September 11th for New Hampshire. Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin has shown us how necessary it is to elect Republican Governors to save our country.

Mike Pence for Governor of Indiana

To make Indiana the state that works we must make job creation job one. Where we promote private sector job growth, develop world class schools, protect taxpayers and support Hoosier families.

I will fight for the right of every Hoosier to run our schools, buy our healthcare, build our roads and heat our homes without the heavy hand of the liberal federal government breathing down our necks.

Jack Dalrymple incumbent Governor of North Dakota

The most recent statistics compiled by Job Service North Dakota show a total of 24,059 online job postings in April, 16 percent higher than in March and 66 percent higher than one year ago. A majority of job openings, nearly 66 percent, were in counties that don’t produce oil.

That’s a very, very lost fact. North Dakota

Many of the Fargo openings revolve around jobs that require advanced education or training. The Fargo region had 637 openings for business, finance, computers, math, architecture and engineering fields, as compared with 117 for those occupations in the Williston region.

Those jobs tend to be more stable. Some developers talk about job permanence, the ones that are most likely to last for an extended period of time. A lot of those folks would say they like what they see in the (Fargo) region.

Small startup tech companies are the best job creators. Once they set out to commercialize a breakthrough product, the pace at which they create jobs is faster than anything else and the potential for higher paying jobs is much better than anything else.

Gary Herbert incumbent Governor of Utah

Utah is on the road to economic recovery and the federal government needs to get out of its way. Our state is growing now, and as we look to the horizon, Utah’s growth prospects are truly bright.

Be assured that this governor is firmly resolved to fortify our state as bulwark against federal overreach.

Every sector in our economy is growing again, except one. And I’m proud to say the sector that is not growing is state government. Government must create an environment where free enterprise can succeed and then get out of the way.

Pat McCrory for Governor of North Carolina

Referring back to the North Carolina of his youth in the late ’60s, McCrory said the state had lost its reputation for good roads, good schools and low taxes, and it had become a state with some the region’s highest taxes in income, corporate and gasoline taxes.

This is the Perdue-Easley machine and the Perdue-Dalton machine,” McCrory told about 2,000 delegates and guests. “Right now this is not the state I grew up in. We can do so much better.

McCrory highlighted the comments made a couple of weeks ago by Dustin Ingalls, the assistant to the director of Public Policy Polling, a Democratic-leaning polling firm in Raleigh. Ingalls made inflammatory comments about McCrory while speaking to a Fayetteville Democratic club.

He twice read Ingalls’ comments, in which he said: “We have to eviscerate McCrory. There is no way to prop up Dalton enough.’’

I didn’t know what it meant. It means they are going to open me up and take (my) guts out.

Ladies and gentlemen, they can try to eviscerate me. But I am tired of them trying to eviscerate jobs in North Carolina.

Rick Hill for Governor of Montana

Hill, on primary election night, made it clear he will be using the familiar GOP tactic of labeling the Democrat as too liberal for Montana.

I think there is a clearly contrast here. He is the candidate of trial lawyers and environmentalists. We are going to represent everyone else.

Bill Maloney for Governor of West Virginia

Republican gubernatorial nominee Bill Maloney says the state’s economy could be in a lot better shape especially if the state paid more attention to developing small businesses.

I’ve been all over this state and people are just sick of it. They want to see a different attitude. It’s about helping people get into business, not hindering them. The whole attitude is backward.

Gov. Tomblin says projects like the Macy’s Distribution Center in Martinsburg and the Gestamp plant in South Charleston will further strengthen the economy.

Maloney says those are “fake jobs” because the state has given away so much to attract the development.

We make too many deals with big companies like Gestamp and Macy’s and we lose out on the small businesses that are here that we could help and nurture. There are so many of them that move out of this state

Maloney says the state’s inability to attract the natural gas cracker plant is as far as you have to look when considering the state’s economy.

Why do you think we lost a cracker? Earl Ray’s not talking about that anymore. We lost a cracker.

Randy Brock for Governor of Vermont

I’m concerned by the large amount of land that has to be bulldozed and opened up in order to get these towers up to the top of the mountains. People don’t come to Vermont to look at wind towers with lights with noise and with all the associated issues that go along with them.

I’m concerned about the economic viability of renewable technologies that aren’t going to reduce our carbon footprint, that aren’t going to result in the closing of any gas fired or oil fired power plants. Because those plants will still need to be in operation and perhaps even dirtier than they were before in order to provide back up for the intermittent power sources that are on and off depending upon the sun is shining or the wind is blowing.

Retired Middlebury College political science professor Eric Davis thinks this is an issue where Brock can gain some traction in his race against incumbent governor Peter Shumlin.

If Brock were to make the argument that some of the energy policy that the Shumlin Administration is proposing is going to lead to higher rates for Vermonters across the board because it depends on heavily subsidized forms of renewable energy which would be priced above market or there’s uncertainty as to where the other sources will come from. I think if Brock were to make that kind of argument about energy he might be able to make some headway.

Jeff Cragg for Governor of Delaware

Jeff Cragg, a business owner from Brandywine Hundred, toured the state Tuesday announcing his candidacy for governor.

Cragg, who will represent Delaware’s Republican Party in November, is running alongside Milford business owner Sher Valenzuela, who announced her bid for lieutenant governor as well, Tuesday.

In large print across Cragg’s campaign truck, the number 30,611 acted as the candidates’ backdrop. This number represents the state’s total unemployed, Cragg said.

We’re here to challenge the Democratic administration. I’m here to challenge the governor. We are here to challenge the very questionable decisions the governor and his administration have made. We are here to provide leadership and better choices for Delawareans.

Cragg said state resources need to be used for helping small businesses grow rather than attracting large corporations.

We want Fisker in Delaware. We need those jobs. That said, if we spent the resources and time hunting for jobs and bring no jobs to Delaware, you don’t blame the elephant — in this case, Fisker — you blame the hunter’s strategy and the hunter’s effectiveness.

Ovide Lamontagne for Governor of New Hampshire

As governor, he would join the lawsuit against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; introduce free-market reforms to allow competition in health care and insurance markets; and put a 90-day moratorium on new regulations while a cost/benefit analysis is completed.

I understand firsthand the challenges businesses are facing.

I’m going to go in there with my conservative principles and serve the people of New Hampshire.

Each time we exercise our freedoms and liberties and guard against the erosion of the uniquely American values and principles upon which our nation was founded, we honor those service men and women who dedicated their lives in the line of duty

Let’s send a message across New Hampshire that the conservative movement and the Republican party is alive and well.

Rob McKenna for Governor of Washington

McKenna contends lawmakers should have more input into union contracts, such as the ability to offer amendments. He also wants to make greater use of existing authority to seek bids from private companies to do work now performed by state workers. Unions would be able to compete for the work too.

In some areas, such as state workers-compensation insurance, he sees a role for private firms.

McKenna wants to close pension-only retirement plans to future workers and put them in newer plans that are hybrids of pension and 401(k)-style accounts.

What’s happening now is that funding for public union contracts goes to the front of the line ahead of every other kind of spending because the Legislature has no direct role in the negotiations.

Dave Spence for Governor of Missouri

Missouri Republican gubernatorial candidate Dave Spence is floating a new approach to rebuild I-70 across the state.

Spence says the cost of building an 8-lane highway could be reduced from four billion to three billion dollar, if the workers who build it, are not paid a prevailing wage.

Maybe we should suspend prevailing wage to get I-70, because if we take on $4 billion dollars we’re paying 25% higher for prevailing wage in our state. That’s a hidden tax everyone’s paying.

I think we need to have some common sense, meet-in-the-middle on this with the unions and say, ‘does that make sense anymore because we’re putting it on the backs of our grandkids to pay off.

Spence does not support turning I-70 into a toll road or raising fuel or cigarette taxes.

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

7 COMMENTS

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7 COMMENTS

  1. Pilgrim, you didn’t mention anything about Pence’s chances. I don’t know who is running against him, but I think he’s an excellent candidate.

    Thanks for all the great research you do.

    • I should have been more clear.  Indiana is one of the three states with a GOP Governor, and Mike Pence will win this Governor seats for a GOP hold. The three seats that should switch from Dem to GOP are North Carolina, Montana, and New Hampshire. Queen Hotchy may proclaim Missouri will switch from Dem to GOP too.

    • Pence’s opponent is not a physically attractive candidate, and while he claims to be not a liberal, he of course has the support of all of them and the unions.  But Pence should win handily.

  2. Valuable insights on where the contenders stand , especially the sense they need to be more independent from DC.    The one questionable comment is from Gragg of Delaware, stating they want Fisker in Delaware.  I know as Gov. you have to be pro-business at almost any cost, but my take on Fisker is 1. They are Scandinavian and have no particular loyalty to Delaware and 2. Yes, it is the politician’s fault for doing the crony capital thing with them, but when Fisker took US dollars as an incentive and then came out with the statement they were building that stupid car in Finland because there was no suitable facilities anywhere in the entire US to build it, I smelled a rat, and I’m not running for Governor.

  3. Rick Hill in particular impresses me. And I have always been a huge fan of Mike Pence (I wanted him to stay and fight and take John Boehner’s job in the House, but hey, you can’t always get what you want).

    Go, team!  I concur with the Pilgrim – we’ll pick up a net 3 or better – America the nation is marching rightward, while Washington is bolting leftward.  That’s gonna …. be interesting.

  1. Pilgrim, you didn’t mention anything about Pence’s chances. I don’t know who is running against him, but I think he’s an excellent candidate.

    Thanks for all the great research you do.

    • I should have been more clear.  Indiana is one of the three states with a GOP Governor, and Mike Pence will win this Governor seats for a GOP hold. The three seats that should switch from Dem to GOP are North Carolina, Montana, and New Hampshire. Queen Hotchy may proclaim Missouri will switch from Dem to GOP too.

    • Pence’s opponent is not a physically attractive candidate, and while he claims to be not a liberal, he of course has the support of all of them and the unions.  But Pence should win handily.

  2. Valuable insights on where the contenders stand , especially the sense they need to be more independent from DC.    The one questionable comment is from Gragg of Delaware, stating they want Fisker in Delaware.  I know as Gov. you have to be pro-business at almost any cost, but my take on Fisker is 1. They are Scandinavian and have no particular loyalty to Delaware and 2. Yes, it is the politician’s fault for doing the crony capital thing with them, but when Fisker took US dollars as an incentive and then came out with the statement they were building that stupid car in Finland because there was no suitable facilities anywhere in the entire US to build it, I smelled a rat, and I’m not running for Governor.

  3. Rick Hill in particular impresses me. And I have always been a huge fan of Mike Pence (I wanted him to stay and fight and take John Boehner’s job in the House, but hey, you can’t always get what you want).

    Go, team!  I concur with the Pilgrim – we’ll pick up a net 3 or better – America the nation is marching rightward, while Washington is bolting leftward.  That’s gonna …. be interesting.

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