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More Pluribus Demands More Unum

I took the title out of a recent column by Rich Lowry, Assimilation, Now More Than Ever. This column is about how the majority of all births in the United States are nonwhite babies. Here is an excerpt . . .

In 1910, immigrants were a greater percentage of the population, at 14.7 percent, than they were in 2010, at 12.9 percent. And many of those immigrants weren’t considered “white.” In 1922, an Alabama court threw out a miscegenation conviction against a black man because he had married a Sicilian woman. The court reasoned that she wasn’t conclusively white enough to commit the crime of interracial marriage.

After its high in 1910, the percentage of immigrants plunged in ensuing decades. We paused to integrate the immigrants we already had. The current wave is slowing but not stopping. About one out of ten births in America is to a woman born in Mexico. That is unprecedented.

If we are to avoid the racialized politics that tears at the fabric of other multiracial societies, we’ll need a revival of a patriotic assimilation that long ago fell out of style. More pluribus demands more unum.

The liberal media try to use these kind of statistics to establish the narrative that this spells DOOM for the Republican Party. They say that the Republican Party is made up of conservative old white men who eventually will die along with the party. I absolutely reject this false narrative. What I am seeing in Texas are hispanics leaving the Democrat Party and joining the Republican Party. I believe that once people who have a parent born in Mexico, Azores, or Portugal think about the issues instead of the portrayal of the Republican Party by the liberal media, then they know they belong in the Republican Party.

Let’s look at something many do not know about – the parents of three Republicans, Mitt Romney, Rep. Devin Nunes (CA-21), and Sen. Pat Toomey (PA).


George Romney, father of Mitt Romney
George Romney’s parents, Gaskell Romney (1871–1955) and Anna Amelia Pratt (1876–1926), were born in Utah, however before it was admitted into statehood which occurred January 4, 1896. They married in 1895 in Mexico and lived in Colonia Dublán in Galeana in the state of Chihuahua (one of the Mormon colonies in Mexico) where George was born on July 8, 1907. They practiced monogamy (polygamy having been abolished by the 1890 Manifesto, although it persisted in places, especially Mexico). George had three older brothers, two younger brothers, and a younger sister. Gaskell Romney was a successful carpenter, house builder, and farmer who headed the most prosperous family in the colony, which was situated in an agricultural valley below the Sierra Madre Occidental. The family chose U.S. citizenship for their children, including George.

The Mexican Revolution broke out in 1910 and the Mormon colonies were endangered in 1911–1912 by raids from marauders, including “Red Flaggers” Pascual Orozco and José Inés Salazar. Young George heard the sound of distant gunfire and saw rebels walking through the village streets. The Romney family fled and returned to the United States in July 1912, leaving their home and almost all of their property behind. Romney would later say, “We were the first displaced persons of the 20th century.”

In the United States, Romney grew up in humble circumstances. The family subsisted with other Mormon refugees on government relief in El Paso, Texas for a few months before moving to Los Angeles, California, where Gaskell Romney worked as a carpenter. In kindergarten, other children mocked Romney’s national origin by calling him “Mex.”

In 1913, the family moved to Oakley, Idaho, and bought a farm, where they grew and subsisted largely on Idaho potatoes. The farm was not on good land and failed when potato prices fell. The family moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1916, where Gaskell Romney resumed construction work, but the family remained generally poor. In 1917, they moved to Rexburg, Idaho, where Gaskell became a successful home and commercial builder in an area growing owing to high World War I commodities prices.
George started working in wheat and sugar beet fields at the age of eleven and was the valedictorian at his grammar school graduation in 1921. The Depression of 1920–21 brought a collapse in prices and local building was abandoned. His family returned to Salt Lake City in 1921, and while his father resumed construction, George became skilled at lath-and-plaster work. The family was again prospering when the Great Depression hit in 1929 and ruined them. George watched his parents fail financially in Idaho and Utah and having to take a dozen years to pay off their debts. Seeing their struggles influenced his life and business career.

He is the hardest-working person I’ve ever met besides his father, George Romney, who was a crazy man. But he – crazy good, crazy unbelievable good. Ann Romney

They called my dad ‘The Brick’. That was his nickname, The Brick, just solid. Just couldn’t penetrate. Mitt Romney


Evelyn Nunes, grandmother of Rep. Devin Nunes
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), represents the rural paradise of California’s 21st District. A conservative Republican in a state dominated by Democrats from a rural area pressed between Los Angeles to the south and San Francisco to the north, Nunes has to hustle for votes more than many House members. The area that makes up the 21st District — sometimes referred to as “Appalachia West” — still thwarts a lot of luck. The district’s poverty rates run above average, it’s running out of the water vital to sustaining agribusiness and the walnut trees aren’t the only green life to flourish in these pastures of plenty.

Nunes is at ease at home. Unlike many veteran politicos, Nunes doesn’t treat his district like a foreign country or an occupational hazard. He’s still young enough to belong to a place other than Washington.

Nunes began farming outside Tulare on land that remains in the family. Like many families in the Central Valley, the Nunes family is of Portuguese-Azorean heritage, coming over from the islands in the early years of the last century.

“Portuguese families have strong work ethics, and they work hard no matter what industry they’re in,” he says.

Nunes was raised on the farm, and like most farm children he was put to work at an early age, tending calves and later on driving the tractor. He was, by his own admission, less of a farmer than other family members. There were incidents. Like the time he drove a tractor into a bridge, resulting in a demotion in duties.

Nunes grins sheepishly, retelling the story: “I broke so many tractors, they made me work with the cows.” His grandmother, Evelyn Nunes, is on hand and smiles in agreement.

Mary Ann Toomey, mother of Sen. Patrick Andrade Toomey
Patrick Andrade Toomey was born Nov. 17, 1961, in Providence, R.I., the third of six children. His father, Patrick, was a union worker who laid cable for Narragansett Electric Company, and his mother, Mary Ann, worked as a part-time secretary at St. Martha’s, a Catholic church. Son of a Portuguese mother, Toomey is a conservative Republican US Senator from Pennsylvania.

The one thing all three of these families have in common is their assimilation. George Romney went from being nicknamed ‘Mex’ in kindergarten in Los Angeles to earning the nickname ‘The Brick’ as CEO of American Motors in Detroit. Devin Nunes went from working with cows on a farm in California’s Central Valley to serving in the US House. Pat Toomey went from being raised in Rhode Island by a union worker and a Portuguese mother to serving in the US Senate. Mitt Romney’s life has been less difficult than what his father experienced, but I believe Mitt learned valuable lessons about life from his father. These lessons give me confidence that Mitt can be elected President in 2012 and put our nation back on the track it should be on.

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

13 COMMENTS

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13 COMMENTS

    • I agree m’lady.  I once worked with a vietnamese guy who had been one of the boat people at age 15. He told me the US got the cream of the crop from Vietnam with people willing to risk their life for freedom in the South China Sea than submit to the reeducation camps. He knew when the Catholic Relief Services worked to find him an Anerican family in Ohio that learning English was job #1.

  1. With a title like that, how could I NOT give this a hearty two thumbs up? And by the way, love it. These 3 guys, you can see what a part was played in their lives by heritage, by family, by love of country.
    .
    It is a shame what pop culture and academia do to undermine all 3 of those.  It is taking its toll. Once reason Democrats are even competitive is because…. how to say this politely…. so many people are gullible.

    • I was thinking my title just might get your attention.  You know I could have picked three from Texas and Florida, but I picked politicians who are not seen by most folks for having families that assimilated and grasped American exceptionalism.

  2. The assimilation practices of the last century, as evidenced in public schools, where most of it went on, was under the banner of the “Doctrine of Liberty” as stated by George William Curtis, co-founder of the Republican Party, in 1863. It was national secular religion in America until FDR.
     

  3. Great article Pilgrim.  The lesson is that America works when Americans are all Americans first and whatever their racial or ethic identity second. 

    Also thank for the specific information in the article.  I knew that Romney’s father was born in Mexico, but I had no idea that they fled to avoid the Mexican religious persecutions. 

    I’ve become interested in the early 20th century religious persecution due to the recent movie  ‘For Greater Glory’ (which I haven’t seen yet).  And due to the local Catholic Church Bishop Jenky stirring a controversy by stating that Obama’s recent interference in church practice is reminicent of other dictators actions prior to their really abhorent behavior.   Unfortunately Jenky’s homily included the name Hitler and allowed the libs to  mischaracterise what he was saying.   What I’ve noticed is that Obama’s actions are more closely related to the actions of the Mexican government prior to their persecutions rather than those of Hitler.

    And article at the time quotes the Mexican President as saying:
    “THERE is no persecution of the Church in Mexico, but all religious organizations must confine their activities to spiritual affairs,” 

    https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/69583/chester-lloyd-jones/roots-of-the-mexican-church-conflict

    That seems to fit with the ideology of most Progressives today including The Won.  That ideology lead to mass slaughter of Catholics in Mexico. 

    • They did not flee Mexico because of religious persecution in 1912.  The Mexican Revolution started in 1910, and the Romneys fled to get out of a war zone.  The movie you are referring happened between 1926 and 1929 when the Mexican government attacked the catholics in Mexico.

  4. As the son of an immigrant from the Dominican Republic and a Missouri farm girl, let me just say that I appreciate the stories you’ve shared and the future vision they evoke.

    To the extent that immigrants have assimilated into US culture, as opposed to establishing enclaves of the one they left behind, America is a better place.

    To be American by immigration is a choice, a wonderful choice. Failing to adopt the values and heritage of your new country dilutes the very brew that drew you here in the first place. 

    I’m proud of my father and my heritage. I’m more proud of my Country and the long line of Patriots and Liberty lovers such as yourselves with which I’m able to associate and identify because I’m here. Whatever value is found in other countries, and it’s there, it pales in comparison to Freedom found here in these United States.

    Great post!!

  5. Great and useful post, Pilgrim.  The only worthwhile nugget out of the whole Obama presidency is where he spouts the line “…and everybody plays by the same rules.”  Which of course he doesn’t mean; he doesn’t even know what he’s talking about.  If I went around saying “I’m a White Man and proud of it,” etc. I would be chastised by the consensus maker/takers.  But those who wear their “Blackness” on their sleeve are held up as icons.
    Unfortunately for them “Black” is on the way out and “LGBTQAIOSU” is on the way in and Obama’s minions are in the process of bending the “rules” to accommodate the self-righteous minority.

    • I agree m’lady.  I once worked with a vietnamese guy who had been one of the boat people at age 15. He told me the US got the cream of the crop from Vietnam with people willing to risk their life for freedom in the South China Sea than submit to the reeducation camps. He knew when the Catholic Relief Services worked to find him an Anerican family in Ohio that learning English was job #1.

  1. With a title like that, how could I NOT give this a hearty two thumbs up? And by the way, love it. These 3 guys, you can see what a part was played in their lives by heritage, by family, by love of country.
    .
    It is a shame what pop culture and academia do to undermine all 3 of those.  It is taking its toll. Once reason Democrats are even competitive is because…. how to say this politely…. so many people are gullible.

    • I was thinking my title just might get your attention.  You know I could have picked three from Texas and Florida, but I picked politicians who are not seen by most folks for having families that assimilated and grasped American exceptionalism.

  2. The assimilation practices of the last century, as evidenced in public schools, where most of it went on, was under the banner of the “Doctrine of Liberty” as stated by George William Curtis, co-founder of the Republican Party, in 1863. It was national secular religion in America until FDR.
     

  3. Great article Pilgrim.  The lesson is that America works when Americans are all Americans first and whatever their racial or ethic identity second. 

    Also thank for the specific information in the article.  I knew that Romney’s father was born in Mexico, but I had no idea that they fled to avoid the Mexican religious persecutions. 

    I’ve become interested in the early 20th century religious persecution due to the recent movie  ‘For Greater Glory’ (which I haven’t seen yet).  And due to the local Catholic Church Bishop Jenky stirring a controversy by stating that Obama’s recent interference in church practice is reminicent of other dictators actions prior to their really abhorent behavior.   Unfortunately Jenky’s homily included the name Hitler and allowed the libs to  mischaracterise what he was saying.   What I’ve noticed is that Obama’s actions are more closely related to the actions of the Mexican government prior to their persecutions rather than those of Hitler.

    And article at the time quotes the Mexican President as saying:
    “THERE is no persecution of the Church in Mexico, but all religious organizations must confine their activities to spiritual affairs,” 

    https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/69583/chester-lloyd-jones/roots-of-the-mexican-church-conflict

    That seems to fit with the ideology of most Progressives today including The Won.  That ideology lead to mass slaughter of Catholics in Mexico. 

    • They did not flee Mexico because of religious persecution in 1912.  The Mexican Revolution started in 1910, and the Romneys fled to get out of a war zone.  The movie you are referring happened between 1926 and 1929 when the Mexican government attacked the catholics in Mexico.

  4. As the son of an immigrant from the Dominican Republic and a Missouri farm girl, let me just say that I appreciate the stories you’ve shared and the future vision they evoke.

    To the extent that immigrants have assimilated into US culture, as opposed to establishing enclaves of the one they left behind, America is a better place.

    To be American by immigration is a choice, a wonderful choice. Failing to adopt the values and heritage of your new country dilutes the very brew that drew you here in the first place. 

    I’m proud of my father and my heritage. I’m more proud of my Country and the long line of Patriots and Liberty lovers such as yourselves with which I’m able to associate and identify because I’m here. Whatever value is found in other countries, and it’s there, it pales in comparison to Freedom found here in these United States.

    Great post!!

  5. Great and useful post, Pilgrim.  The only worthwhile nugget out of the whole Obama presidency is where he spouts the line “…and everybody plays by the same rules.”  Which of course he doesn’t mean; he doesn’t even know what he’s talking about.  If I went around saying “I’m a White Man and proud of it,” etc. I would be chastised by the consensus maker/takers.  But those who wear their “Blackness” on their sleeve are held up as icons.
    Unfortunately for them “Black” is on the way out and “LGBTQAIOSU” is on the way in and Obama’s minions are in the process of bending the “rules” to accommodate the self-righteous minority.

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