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The 2012 Texas Primary Is Relevant

I am someone who was groaning after some Democrat judges in San Antonio rejected the Texas legislature’s redistricting map and drew their own. This was the beginning of a legal battle which led to Texas not holding the primary on Super Tuesday, March 6th. So Texas is now relevant in being the state that takes Mitt Romney’s delegate count above the needed 1,144. His delegate count is currently 1,043, and I believe the majority of the 155 delegates available in Texas will go to Romney.

Another important point regarding the later primary is watching the establishment candidates for US Senate get defeated in Indiana and Nebraska. This gives more confidence and belief that Texas will also have the grass roots supported Ted Cruz defeat the establishment supported David Dewhurst for the Texas GOP US Senate nominee. I am voting for Ted Cruz.

In Texas, when no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote in any Primary, a runoff is held between the two top finishers. The Texas runoff is July 31, 2012. I predict the runoff primary will include the US Senate contest and the US House contests in TX-14, TX-25, and TX-36. There could be more runoff contests, but these contests are the most likely due to the number of GOP candidates competing in these races. There are 12 running for TX-25, 12 running for TX-36, 9 running for TX-14, and 9 running for US Senate.

Currently, there are 25 Republicans and 9 Democrats in the Texas congressional delegation. Based on the 2010 US census 4 new congressional districts have been created. Due to Voter Rights Act laws Texas is restricted in the way the congressional district boundaries can be drawn. At a minimum, I expect the new Texas congressional delegation to be comprised of 28 Republicans and 10 Democrats. Optimistically there could be 30 Republicans and 8 Democrats.

Let’s look at three contests: US Senate, TX-34, and TX-35. The three candidates I hope win the nomination and the general election are Ted Cruz, Jessica Puente Bradshaw, and Susan Narvais. I’ll be voting for Ted Cruz, but I can only cheer for the other two.

Ted Cruz is what you have if you combined Senator Marco Rubio and Senator Mike Lee into one person. Ted Cruz shares a Cuban heritage and a charismatic persona with Marco Rubio, and he shares a profound respect and understanding of the US Constitution with Mike Lee. Cruz has been endorsed by Sarah Palin, Rand Paul, George Will, Mark Levin, Jim DeMint, James Dobson, Sean Hannity, Ron Paul, FreedomWorks, the Club for Growth, the Tea Party Express and countless prominent conservative individuals and groups. No other Senate primary candidate in the country has come close to securing such an impressive breadth of endorsements.

Brownsville, Texas, December 17, 2011 – On Friday, December 16th, Jessica Puente Bradshaw formally announced her candidacy in newly formed U.S. Congressional District 34.

Puente Bradshaw was born in Matamoros and raised in Brownsville. She attended Immaculate Conception School, Russell Elementary, and Stell Middle School in Brownsville and South Texas High School for Heath Professions (a.k.a. Med High) in Mercedes. Jessica has a consistent record of serving her community, including being a nurse assistant, an educator, teaching citizenship classes and middle school, and actively working to help immigrants buy their first homes.

In the 2010 U.S Congressional race, Jessica won the Republican primary in Cameron County and was endorsed by the Republican Liberty Caucus.

As a first generation American, Jessica understands that people come to the United States for opportunity and freedom. She believes, “personal liberties and freedom go beyond party lines but constant and consistent legislation from both sides strips us of our freedoms.” Jessica affirms, “I will always use the principles and values, as outlined by the U.S Constitution and Bill of Rights, as the measure for legislative decisions.”

U.S. Congressional District 34 includes all/or portions of Cameron, Hidalgo, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Willacy, San Patricio, Bee, DeWitt, Gonzales, Goliad, and Kenedy counties.

She is a young, attractive hispanic who is articulate. She ran and lost to Blake Farenthold in the 2010 TX-27 primary. The newly created TX-34 is basically the southern portion of the old TX-27. She is probably the underdog to Democrat Ramiro Garza in the general, but I am rooting for her.

The Honorable Susan Narvaiz is President and CEO of Core Strategies, Inc., a business she established in June 1997 which provides consulting services in the area of Organizational Transformation, Public Policy, Civic Engagement, Public Relations, Human Resources, Employment, Training and Facilitation.

She is the former mayor of San Marcos, Texas where she was re-elected to her third term as Mayor on Nov. 4, 2008. She was first elected by the people of San Marcos in 2004 and was re-elected in 2006. Before serving as Mayor, she was elected to Place 3 on the City Council in 2002.

Susan Narvaiz currently serves as a Board Member and on the Advocacy Committee for Girl Scouts of Central Texas, is a Board Member and Secretary of Freedom Legacy International and is a member of the Advisory Council for the Literacy Coalition of Central Texas and on the Texas State CAMCO Board. She is a Past Chair of the Capital Area Council of Governments (CAPCOG) where she served on the Executive Committee since 2004. She has served on the Finance, Administration and Intergovernmental Relations (FAIR) Policy Committee for the National League of Cities, on the Intergovernmental Relations Task Force for the Texas Municipal League and as the President of the San Marcos Hays County EMS Board of Directors. She also served on the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) Board of Directors. Susan served as the first chair of the Hays-Caldwell Public Utility Agency and continued in that role until January of 2011.

In March 2008, Susan Narvaiz was appointed by the Texas Transportation Commission to serve on an advisory committee for the I-35 Corridor. The committee recently submitted the MY35 Report to the Commission which provides recommendations for future transportation planning based on projected I35 corridor development and economic, political, societal and population trends. Recently, Susan was one of nine leaders statewide appointed to serve on the Unfunded Mandates Task Force by Governor Rick Perry.

Unlike the grassroots supported candidates, Ted Cruz and Jessica Bradshaw, Susan Narvais is an “establishment” supported candidate. Still, she is preferable to the Democrat, Lloyd Doggett. A lot of the legal chicanery that delayed the Texas primary involved an attempt to keep the 25th congressional district intact and safe for Lloyd Doggett. The new 35th district includes part of the old 25th and a sliver of territory stretching between Austin and San Antonio. She is probably the underdog to Democrat Lloyd Doggett, but it’s good to root for the underdog.

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

5 COMMENTS

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5 COMMENTS

  1. I agree. Even with court-drawn (ugh, commies in the weeds) district maps, conservatism is on the rise and I expect to pick up. I voted early (for Ted Cruz and Joe Barton, yeah!), but will likewise be watching these and several other races.

    These 3 (and add to them Michael Williams running in that crowded CD25 primary) represent some fresh conservative blood. Like Narvaiz, Williams has some pretty hefty GOP Establishment backing, but is no less a conservative.

    Knocking off Doggett would be a dream come true. We came close in 2010. I am not sure how favorably they drew CD35 for him. Being slimy Dem judges, I expect they tried to carve out a district just for him. Which doesn’t mean we can’t take him down.

  2. The Voting Rights Act has turned into a cynical political tool that the Democrats use to prop up an artificially high number in elected office than would otherwise obtain, but the fact is that Dems can gain only so much by moving voting lines around.

    Texas matters always for Republicans. It is the closest thing we have, electorally, to the Dems’ California. We need to foster tea partier/Reagan-like conservatism in Texas.

    more later and great report pil’

  1. I agree. Even with court-drawn (ugh, commies in the weeds) district maps, conservatism is on the rise and I expect to pick up. I voted early (for Ted Cruz and Joe Barton, yeah!), but will likewise be watching these and several other races.

    These 3 (and add to them Michael Williams running in that crowded CD25 primary) represent some fresh conservative blood. Like Narvaiz, Williams has some pretty hefty GOP Establishment backing, but is no less a conservative.

    Knocking off Doggett would be a dream come true. We came close in 2010. I am not sure how favorably they drew CD35 for him. Being slimy Dem judges, I expect they tried to carve out a district just for him. Which doesn’t mean we can’t take him down.

  2. The Voting Rights Act has turned into a cynical political tool that the Democrats use to prop up an artificially high number in elected office than would otherwise obtain, but the fact is that Dems can gain only so much by moving voting lines around.

    Texas matters always for Republicans. It is the closest thing we have, electorally, to the Dems’ California. We need to foster tea partier/Reagan-like conservatism in Texas.

    more later and great report pil’

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