Friday, September 17, 2021
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What Romney Must Do

Conservatives of all stripes have their issues with Governor Romney.  Social conservatives despise his previous positions on life, gay marriage, and the social safety net.  Fiscal conservatives despise him because he lobbied for TARP, increased spending and raised taxes while governor of Taxachusetts, and implemented the father of Obamacare (something all Conservatives except Ann Coulter takes offense to).  Heck, even middle-of-the-road 2nd Amendment advocates aren’t exactly thrilled with Mitt Romney’s praise of his homestate’s restrictive gun laws.  Romney is winning by losing, and while he tends to maximize the success of a losing effort, he’s got to eventually got to come to terms with conservatives.  Mitt’s largest win – by percentage of popular vote received – so far in the continuous 50 states has been in the Commonwealth, but conservative voters weren’t exactly running to the polls to support Romney.  Romney won my precinct 148 to 110 – convincing for sure, but the hidden number was the 27 undervotes cast on paper ballots.  10% of those who came to vote in the primary in my precinct alone rejected both candidates*. As voters came out of the polling place, they’d stop by the Republican table and tell us that they weren’t ready to vote for Romney.  They are ready to forgive him for his past social and fiscal transgressions.  They are willing to forgive the a reformed liberal Republican governor of a liberal state – much like our Conservative hero Ronald Reagan.  So how does a social & fiscal conservative and 2nd Amendment advocate like me forgive Mitt Romney for the all of the things mentioned above?

In order for Mitt Romney to receive my support, he must first flatly and firmly reject Romneycare.  He must admit that the individual mandate in his state is unconstitutional under federal law.  He certainly can’t go about calling Obamacare’s plan such as a state’s individual mandate certainly wouldn’t supercede The Commerce Clause.  Likewise, he can’t go talking about how much money Massachusetts has saved.  Premiums have gone up and up and up and up since he signed this landmark legislation into law.  He has said that he would repeal Obamacare, but hasn’t articulated to what extent.

Romney must also address – fully – his flip-flop on the issue of life.  He can cite Reagan’s conversion all day long, but Reagan had decades between his term as the original guvernator and the Oval Office.  Romney’s change happened rather recently, and inexplicably.  All of the sudden he is a pro-life warrior – which wouldn’t be a big surprise considering his sincere allegiance to his faith – but carries a very well documented history of defending Roe.  This is problematic in another, more important issue.  Should Romney be elected he will most likely appoint three new justices to the Supreme Court.  The last milquetoast Republican to appoint Supreme Court justices was George H.W. Bush who gave us Justice Souter – and Justice Thomas, so GHWB was really a wash in that regard.

Romney must also – right now – reject negative campaigning.  While he may be benefiting from negative ads in primary states, he is quite literally turning more and more conservatives off because they feel like Romney is attacking them!  I realize that the primary is a full-contact blood sport, but this has gone a bit too far.  His wins (and near wins) keep on coming in, but his negatives are skyrocketing, driving the GOP brand into the toilet.  He needs to rise above it.  I am a staunchly non-Romney guy having backed Cain, then Perry, then Gingrich (now nobody) but was beside myself when they attacked Romney for being – of all things – a capitalist!  Romney needs to do a better job explaining to people – without coming off too tin-eared – that he did what he had to at Bain in order to spare jobs.  For added measure, Rick Santorum seems to be doing a fine job ruining his own chances, thank-you-very-much.

Oh, and Massachusetts gun laws are horrible and have done absolutely nothing to prevent crime.  He just needs to say, “Hey, I was wrong!”

The bottom line here is, I’m willing to forgive Mitt Romney.  I don’t even care if his apologies are insincere – he is a politician after all – but I need a reason to say, “That’s my guy!”  He has done a spectacularly bad job as coming off as the “everyman,” but he comes off as an even worse candidate when he defends his failures.  Concluding his 2012 CPAC speech, Andrew Breitbart summoned the audience to get behind the nominee – whoever that may be – because four more years of an administration that regularly usurps the Constitution, doubles the national debt, etc., is something we can’t afford.  Obama must be defeated, and if Romney is the man, he’ll begrudgingly have my vote

* At least another 10 votes were cast by Democrats.  They were at least good enough to sign the petitions displayed on our table for Republican candidates for US Senate, but I did not offer them doughnuts!

 

Crossposted at RedState and RedNova

Matt Genkinger
Husband, Father, US Army veteran (deployed in support of OEF and OIF), Constitutional Conservative, Precinct Committeman, Iowan by birth, Virginian by choice

10 COMMENTS

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10 COMMENTS

    • The results of the Illinois primary will be significant to me. Should Romney win big, I fear he continues to ignore conservatives. The longer this goes on, the more likely he is to court the base.

      • Courting is all we’ll get from him. If we (conservatives) wake up in his bed the morning after the election he’ll gnaw his own arm off to get away from us. But he’s NOT Obama so he’s got that going for him.

        • At this point, I wouldn’t mind a little courtin’ as opposed to the total stiff arm we’ve received so far. I don’t need to believe him, I just need to have him on record saying conservative things — so we can hold him accountable later. If he is going to be our nominee, we’ll have to keep him honest.

          • I don’t really care if Mitt comes courting or not since I don’t plan to end up in bed with him as I want to still respect myself in the morning. But I have that luxury because Obama is a lock to win my state short of SMOD striking first, and even then… Obama is still worse, though.

  1. Good piece, Matt. Thanks. By the time someone is in their sixties, there is no reason for them to be flip-lopping unless they are just rank opportunists. If someone doen’st have something pretty solid under them by that time, except for grubbing after the almighty dollar (and that’s where the vulture capitalist comes in and thats where the patriot conservatives were not remiss in bringing it up)then for those of us who se the STATEof the Union as beingprecarious there are srious doubts about teleprompter readers AND good speech memorizers.

    • I think Romney is the definition of ‘opportunist’ as you’ve illustrated with the vulture capitalist comment. What I failed to mention in my original post is the difficulty that bona fide conservative candidates running for House and Senate seats will have standing next to him on the campaign trail. If we have solid conservative majorities in both houses, we can put pressure on a President Romney to nominate good lawyerly types to the Courts and, hopefully, pass things like Cut, Cap & Balance.

  2. Romney is my last choice of the three remaining (don’t count RP), and you’ve correctly named all the issues about him. It’s up to him, if he wins the nomination, to go all out to make sure the conservatives don’t stay home. I won’t stay home, but the turnout for our Virginia primary (5%) ought to tell the GOP that they have a problem with a Romney candidacy.

    • Concur with you on the need for the GOP to see the flaw in Romney. Didn’t help in the Commonwealth when every prominent Republican (except for Cuchinelli) endorsed Romney. Some, like Bill Bolling, far in advance of the primary, and — like Cantor — when it became obvious that (d’uh) that Romney would win the VA primary. I assume that was only because Ron Paul posed an actual threat. I happened to be listening to a radio show on Saturday where the guest (John Taylor?) said, “In Virginia, conservatism is defined as maintaining the status quo at all costs.” After the most recent assembly session, I couldn’t agree more. The RPV needs a serious change at the top. I am running to be a delegate to the State Convention this summer and hope to bring a little authentic conservatism back to the Commonwealth.

    • The results of the Illinois primary will be significant to me. Should Romney win big, I fear he continues to ignore conservatives. The longer this goes on, the more likely he is to court the base.

      • Courting is all we’ll get from him. If we (conservatives) wake up in his bed the morning after the election he’ll gnaw his own arm off to get away from us. But he’s NOT Obama so he’s got that going for him.

        • At this point, I wouldn’t mind a little courtin’ as opposed to the total stiff arm we’ve received so far. I don’t need to believe him, I just need to have him on record saying conservative things — so we can hold him accountable later. If he is going to be our nominee, we’ll have to keep him honest.

          • I don’t really care if Mitt comes courting or not since I don’t plan to end up in bed with him as I want to still respect myself in the morning. But I have that luxury because Obama is a lock to win my state short of SMOD striking first, and even then… Obama is still worse, though.

  1. Good piece, Matt. Thanks. By the time someone is in their sixties, there is no reason for them to be flip-lopping unless they are just rank opportunists. If someone doen’st have something pretty solid under them by that time, except for grubbing after the almighty dollar (and that’s where the vulture capitalist comes in and thats where the patriot conservatives were not remiss in bringing it up)then for those of us who se the STATEof the Union as beingprecarious there are srious doubts about teleprompter readers AND good speech memorizers.

    • I think Romney is the definition of ‘opportunist’ as you’ve illustrated with the vulture capitalist comment. What I failed to mention in my original post is the difficulty that bona fide conservative candidates running for House and Senate seats will have standing next to him on the campaign trail. If we have solid conservative majorities in both houses, we can put pressure on a President Romney to nominate good lawyerly types to the Courts and, hopefully, pass things like Cut, Cap & Balance.

  2. Romney is my last choice of the three remaining (don’t count RP), and you’ve correctly named all the issues about him. It’s up to him, if he wins the nomination, to go all out to make sure the conservatives don’t stay home. I won’t stay home, but the turnout for our Virginia primary (5%) ought to tell the GOP that they have a problem with a Romney candidacy.

    • Concur with you on the need for the GOP to see the flaw in Romney. Didn’t help in the Commonwealth when every prominent Republican (except for Cuchinelli) endorsed Romney. Some, like Bill Bolling, far in advance of the primary, and — like Cantor — when it became obvious that (d’uh) that Romney would win the VA primary. I assume that was only because Ron Paul posed an actual threat. I happened to be listening to a radio show on Saturday where the guest (John Taylor?) said, “In Virginia, conservatism is defined as maintaining the status quo at all costs.” After the most recent assembly session, I couldn’t agree more. The RPV needs a serious change at the top. I am running to be a delegate to the State Convention this summer and hope to bring a little authentic conservatism back to the Commonwealth.

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