Friday, October 15, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesThe Happy Warrior

The Happy Warrior

What?  Did I paste up the wrong photo?  Sorry.  Anyway I happened across this article and was just thinking about parallels and similarities.  Not in a “purist” sense because, as we all know, driven snow has a corner on that.

“I’m not slipping off in to the sunset. I’m not riding off into the West. We’ve got plenty of work to do right here in the state of Texas,” said Perry at a hotel ballroom just north of Austin, ”and I’ve got plenty of fight left in this 61-year-old body.”

Rick Perry makes first public appearance since dropping out of presidential race_ – YouTube

 

From Democrat to Republican, from successful governor of a large, thriving state to presidential aspirant, from fighting the Beltway Establishment on substance, policy and methodology to being rejected and yet still venturing into the fray, yes, the stories are remarkably similar. Throughout it all, maintaining a self-deprecating sense of humor and yet an unbowed conviction in the rightness of the cause and the necessity of continuing it, the takeaway from the Perry 2012 experience should be one of perseverance and dedication.

 

bobmontgomery
Poor. No advanced degrees. Unorganized. Feeble. Disjointed. Random. Past it. .... Intrigued, Interested, Patriotic and Lucky.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. I have two other modern examples of great Presidents we have mostly forgotten, due to their being unfairly maligned by the socialist academic mafia.

    Warren Harding was faced by a post-WW1 (and post-Woodrow Wilson) depression in 1920 with worse initial numbers than the 1929 or 2008 crashes. He immediately slashed Wilson’s overgrown government by 50%, cut income taxes further yet, and the depression was fixed in 6 months. Unemployment at the end of his term was half what it was at the beginning. Despite this, liberal professors consistently rate him a terrible president. I wonder if the propaganda has something to do with other things that were going on in the early 1920s, like the spread of the Communist Internationale.

    Calvin Coolidge, who was Harding’s VP, was an even more conservative President than Reagan. He kept budgets low and campaigned on letting people spend their money on themselves instead of on government. He was popular enough that in 1928 the Republican Herbert Hoover won election after 8 years of Republican presidency.

  1. I have two other modern examples of great Presidents we have mostly forgotten, due to their being unfairly maligned by the socialist academic mafia.

    Warren Harding was faced by a post-WW1 (and post-Woodrow Wilson) depression in 1920 with worse initial numbers than the 1929 or 2008 crashes. He immediately slashed Wilson’s overgrown government by 50%, cut income taxes further yet, and the depression was fixed in 6 months. Unemployment at the end of his term was half what it was at the beginning. Despite this, liberal professors consistently rate him a terrible president. I wonder if the propaganda has something to do with other things that were going on in the early 1920s, like the spread of the Communist Internationale.

    Calvin Coolidge, who was Harding’s VP, was an even more conservative President than Reagan. He kept budgets low and campaigned on letting people spend their money on themselves instead of on government. He was popular enough that in 1928 the Republican Herbert Hoover won election after 8 years of Republican presidency.

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