Tuesday, September 28, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesTo Dream the Impossible Dream

To Dream the Impossible Dream

All she ever wanted to do, her fondest dream, her life’s ambition, her parents’ hope for her, was to join.  To be a part of something.  To drill and to learn the proud traditions that mark the United States Military.  That’s all.  Why couldn’t they let her realize her dreams?  She would have done anything to be  a part of that group, to do what they do.  Anything, that is, except take off the hijab.

Not all who join the JROTC, or the ROTC, not even all who join the regular Army or even who are commissioned eventually realize their dream to it’s fullest.  Many don’t make the grade, just as in civilian life.  But many are given the chance, if they are willing to make some sacrifices, and if that’s what they really, really, really, really, really want.  Did little Demin really, really, really, really, really want to be an American cadet?  Well, we don’t know for sure, but most who are, or aspire to be, or are in training to be, or who know anybody who knows anything about the military, or who have read anything about it,  know that in order to get permission to do anything in the military, one has to go through the chain of command.  Did little Demin go through the chain of command?  No.  She went to C.A.I.R. (Council on American-Islamic Relations.)  See, she claims to want to be part of this junior military thing, but only on her terms.   This is a new twist, is it not?

Someday someone is going to have to explain this whole CAIR thing to me.  Is it a council that does council work about relations between Americans and Islamics?  Or is it relations between the Council and Islamic-Americans?  If the latter, then why can’t it just be between them and these Islamic Americans they want to have relationships with?  If the former, then is that not an admission that these Islamists either are not Americans or their Americanism is but a footnote and they are all about promoting the Islamist agenda in their relations with, pardon the term, “ordinary” Americans?

At any rate, you will be soothed to know that everything turned out A-Okay for little Demin.  All it took was a little friendly “nudge” (where have I heard that word before?) from CAIR and the Department of Defense was all too willing to overturn rule, tradition, order and discipline to accommodate this little “Army of One”. (Yep; heard that one before, too).  See, these Muslim-Americans, or Islamic Americans, they might not like the whole gay fad currently sweeping the world, including the US military, but they sure are willing to learn a thing or two from the GLAADsters out there ….fighting the good fight. (Poor choice of words, I know).  All it takes is some threats of lawsuits, some publicity campaigns and the help of the compliant US media, and the US Defense Establishment will bend over backwards, or forwards, as the situation warrants, to accomodate.  Now, should little Demin proceed to the next levels in her passionate quest to be a military type, perhaps becoming a real soldier, maybe even attaining a pretty respectable rank, like Major or something, we wonder if she might have any other little personal pecadillos she is not willing to forego, or anything in her conscience that might cause her again to engage the services of CAIR, maybe even seek counseling from an imam or other….advisor….perhaps in Yemen….on what to do about any situation she finds herself in.  Well, we just don’t know, do we?  Probably shouldn’t dwell on it too much.  The main thing is that Demin got in and diversity is just all that, dontchaknow?

We therefore encourage all you little Wiccan kids who really, really, really, really, really want to be just like other American kids and join the Cadets, to show up in your religious headgear (that’s the tall, pointy hats with the wide brims, right?) and demand to be included, and if not, to contact your local Council on American Wiccan Relations to help give the US military a little “nudge”.

You little Wiccan kids don’t practice taqqiyah, do you?

 

 

bobmontgomery
Poor. No advanced degrees. Unorganized. Feeble. Disjointed. Random. Past it. .... Intrigued, Interested, Patriotic and Lucky.

4 COMMENTS

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4 COMMENTS

  1. The British Empire had a lot of experience with this kind of thing in the 19th century. Its armies were soldiered by volunteers from literally all over the globe. But back then they could do unthinkable things by today’s standards. Want to join Her Majesty’s forces and carry a Lee Enfield, eh? We’ll put you in a segregated unit, where you can fight on the nastiest of the Empire’s front lines for awhile – where your political loyalty to H.M will be without question – then when you’ve proved yourselves as a group, you’ve made the cut. (IOW, the privilege to serve had to be first earned) The Sikhs, the Gurkhas, many Mohammedan Pakistani and Hindu regiments, etc., turned in time into damned fine soldiers under this process– and they got to keep their turbans, their holy days, and, after some unpleasantness, their grease-free cartridges. We could never do this today – our Society only sees rights and entitlements, not opportunities and privileges.

  2. Discipline lies at the heart of a successful military unit. Watch some movies of what passed for military tactics in the Revolutionary War or the Civil War. Pickett’s Charge for example. Those units marched over a mile across open, rolling hills, under cannon fire every step of the way. Cannon balls ripping through tightly packed formations, once inside 400 yards or so the cannons switched to grape shot or possibly lengths of chain, anything that would spread out and cause more casualties. Dozens of men would disappear in a bloody mist as the shot tore through their ranks, the only thing the men in the formation could do was “dress right and cover down.” Discipline kept them in formation, discipline kept the entire group from turning and running away in the face of unimaginable horror. Today’s tactics may see you 50 meters from your nearest buddy and your unit relies on you being where you are trained to be, moving when you are expected to move, discipline keeps you there, where you must be to carry out your duties. Or I guess you can just get CAIR to lobby that you are special and someone less special than you should do the shitty, dangerous jobs. You can come in later when its more convenient.

    The Army has long had distinctive headgear, the Maroon Beret or Campaign Hat for example. In the good old days if you wanted to wear them you earned the right to do so. Seems to mean a whole lot more that way.

  1. The British Empire had a lot of experience with this kind of thing in the 19th century. Its armies were soldiered by volunteers from literally all over the globe. But back then they could do unthinkable things by today’s standards. Want to join Her Majesty’s forces and carry a Lee Enfield, eh? We’ll put you in a segregated unit, where you can fight on the nastiest of the Empire’s front lines for awhile – where your political loyalty to H.M will be without question – then when you’ve proved yourselves as a group, you’ve made the cut. (IOW, the privilege to serve had to be first earned) The Sikhs, the Gurkhas, many Mohammedan Pakistani and Hindu regiments, etc., turned in time into damned fine soldiers under this process– and they got to keep their turbans, their holy days, and, after some unpleasantness, their grease-free cartridges. We could never do this today – our Society only sees rights and entitlements, not opportunities and privileges.

  2. Discipline lies at the heart of a successful military unit. Watch some movies of what passed for military tactics in the Revolutionary War or the Civil War. Pickett’s Charge for example. Those units marched over a mile across open, rolling hills, under cannon fire every step of the way. Cannon balls ripping through tightly packed formations, once inside 400 yards or so the cannons switched to grape shot or possibly lengths of chain, anything that would spread out and cause more casualties. Dozens of men would disappear in a bloody mist as the shot tore through their ranks, the only thing the men in the formation could do was “dress right and cover down.” Discipline kept them in formation, discipline kept the entire group from turning and running away in the face of unimaginable horror. Today’s tactics may see you 50 meters from your nearest buddy and your unit relies on you being where you are trained to be, moving when you are expected to move, discipline keeps you there, where you must be to carry out your duties. Or I guess you can just get CAIR to lobby that you are special and someone less special than you should do the shitty, dangerous jobs. You can come in later when its more convenient.

    The Army has long had distinctive headgear, the Maroon Beret or Campaign Hat for example. In the good old days if you wanted to wear them you earned the right to do so. Seems to mean a whole lot more that way.

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