Wednesday, September 22, 2021
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Pearl Harbor Day Open Thread

 

 

Seventy years ago today my dad was a sophomore in high school.  Three years  and eight months later he was on a troop ship on his way to invade Japan.  Had it not been for the development of the atomic bomb, y’all might not be having the pleasure of my company today.  Not sayin’ either development is a particularly wonderful thing…just sayin’.  Have at it.

bobmontgomery
Poor. No advanced degrees. Unorganized. Feeble. Disjointed. Random. Past it. .... Intrigued, Interested, Patriotic and Lucky.

6 COMMENTS

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6 COMMENTS

  1. My dad was a freshman in college and immediately got sent to boot camp and then to the Pacific. He was a radio man for the Army Air Force and traveled all over the Pacific seeing horror after horror. He still remembers and talks about it to his family and remembers his dog tag number. Yep, had it not been for the atomic bomb I’m sure I wouldn’t be here either.

  2. I was in the 25th Infantry Division in ’91 for the 50th Anniversary. A group of gentlemen came through pointing out the bullet holes in our barracks, by that time covered with 40 or so coats of paint. They talked about watching the planes go over, trying to get their weapons from the secured arms room then later seeing the smoke from the burning ships. Later they talked about Guadalcanal, the Solomons and the Philippines. Damn fine men.

    • I was trying cases at Scofield (Army deserters) in ’73 and saw those same bullet holes Nessa. Since my town had bullet holes from coal mine/union violence in the 40’s it is interesting how proud (if that’s the word) to keep those little pieces of history intact.

      My last trip to Pearl was in that period, and unlike today, the Marine standing watch over the motor launch going out to the Arizona still advised Japanese tourists (and their gawdawful camera manners) that they might not be appreciated on such hallowed ground by many of the veterans who go there.

      Considering the vets were still 25-28 years past the war, I thought that a kind gesture. Wouldn’t work today, but I enjoyed seeing it then.

    • 🙂 Being a nobody has its benefits. 25 years after Pearl Harbor I had occasions to be in the vicinity of Dr. Fermi’s experiments beneath Stagg Field and often wondered if that thing he started had sputtered out if perhaps I wouldn’t have been walking around consuming valuable oxygen.

  3. If you ever get the chance, if you or a family member has a military ID card to get you past the guard on the causeway, after you see the completely submerged Arizona, go over to the other side of Ford Island and see the resting berth of the Utah. She was a retired battleship/training ship that morning but looked like an active battleship from the air so the Japanese bombed and torpedoed her as well. She still lies in agony and pride,where she sank. For various reasons the hull couldnt be moved afterwards. *It is still there, partially above water.* The shock and anger of that day are made live to you.

  1. My dad was a freshman in college and immediately got sent to boot camp and then to the Pacific. He was a radio man for the Army Air Force and traveled all over the Pacific seeing horror after horror. He still remembers and talks about it to his family and remembers his dog tag number. Yep, had it not been for the atomic bomb I’m sure I wouldn’t be here either.

  2. I was in the 25th Infantry Division in ’91 for the 50th Anniversary. A group of gentlemen came through pointing out the bullet holes in our barracks, by that time covered with 40 or so coats of paint. They talked about watching the planes go over, trying to get their weapons from the secured arms room then later seeing the smoke from the burning ships. Later they talked about Guadalcanal, the Solomons and the Philippines. Damn fine men.

    • I was trying cases at Scofield (Army deserters) in ’73 and saw those same bullet holes Nessa. Since my town had bullet holes from coal mine/union violence in the 40’s it is interesting how proud (if that’s the word) to keep those little pieces of history intact.

      My last trip to Pearl was in that period, and unlike today, the Marine standing watch over the motor launch going out to the Arizona still advised Japanese tourists (and their gawdawful camera manners) that they might not be appreciated on such hallowed ground by many of the veterans who go there.

      Considering the vets were still 25-28 years past the war, I thought that a kind gesture. Wouldn’t work today, but I enjoyed seeing it then.

    • 🙂 Being a nobody has its benefits. 25 years after Pearl Harbor I had occasions to be in the vicinity of Dr. Fermi’s experiments beneath Stagg Field and often wondered if that thing he started had sputtered out if perhaps I wouldn’t have been walking around consuming valuable oxygen.

  3. If you ever get the chance, if you or a family member has a military ID card to get you past the guard on the causeway, after you see the completely submerged Arizona, go over to the other side of Ford Island and see the resting berth of the Utah. She was a retired battleship/training ship that morning but looked like an active battleship from the air so the Japanese bombed and torpedoed her as well. She still lies in agony and pride,where she sank. For various reasons the hull couldnt be moved afterwards. *It is still there, partially above water.* The shock and anger of that day are made live to you.

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