Wednesday, September 22, 2021
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The National Republican Party and the Republican Party of California

I am old enough to remember when California was a Republican state that could be counted on for their electoral votes for the Presidential elections. In my lifetime, California has elected six Republicans Governor of California and three Democrats. The Republican Party of California, during Pete Wilson’s time as Governor, decided to go hard right with respect to illegals already residing in California, and that decision has cost the Republicans votes that I may not live to see return to the Republican party.

The debate Thursday night in Orlando had moments that reminded me of Governor Pete Wilson. It is still early and a lot of changes are going to occur between now and when the GOP nominates someone for President in 2012. Therefore I am not going to score and grade the current candidates on this debate. However, I am including in this piece what some of the candidates said last night. I put in bold the parts that play well to conservative primary GOP voters, but will cost the GOP votes in the general election from US citizens with a Mexican heritage.

BACHMANN:

As president of the United States, I would do what my job would demand of me. That’s to uphold the sovereignty of the United States of America. To do that, I would build a fence on America’s southern border on every mile, on every yard, on every foot, on every inch of the southern border. I think that’s what we have to do, not only build it, but then also have sufficient border security and enforce the laws that are on the books with the ICE agents, with our border security. And here’s the other thing I would do. I would not allow taxpayer-funded benefits for illegal aliens or for their children. That’s a madness. End the madness for illegal aliens to come into the United States of America.

WALLACE:

Governor Romney, I want to continue a conversation that you had with Governor Perry in the last debate. In Massachusetts, you vetoed legislation to provide interstate tuition rates to the children of illegals. Governor Perry of course signed the Texas Dream Act to do exactly that. But what about Governor Perry’s argument that it’s better to get these kids an education and to get them jobs than to consign them just to being a burden on the state?

ROMNEY:

It’s an argument I just can’t follow. I’ve got be honest with you, I don’t see how it is that a state like Texas — to go to the University of Texas, if you’re an illegal alien, you get an in-state tuition discount. You know how much that is? That’s $22,000 a year. Four years of college, almost $100,000 discount if you are an illegal alien go to the University of Texas. If you are a United States citizen from any one of the other 49 states, you have to pay $100,000 more. That doesn’t make sense to me. And that kind of magnet — That kind of magnet draws people into this country to get that education, to get the $100,000 break. It makes no sense. We have to have — just as Speaker Gingrich said, and as Michele Bachmann said as well, Congresswoman Bachmann, and that is we have to have a fence, we have to have enough Border Patrol agents to secure the fence, we have to have a system like E-Verify that employers can use to identify who is here legally and illegally. We have to crackdown on employers that hire people that are here illegally. And we have to turn off the magnet of extraordinary government benefits like a $100,000 tax credit — or, excuse me, discount for going to the University of Texas. That shouldn’t be allowed. It makes no sense at all.

SANTORUM:

Governor Perry, no one is suggesting up here that the students that are illegal in this country shouldn’t be able to go to a college and university. I think you are sort of making this leap that, unless we subsidize this, the taxpayers subsidize it, they won’t be able to go. Well, most folks who want go to the state of Texas or any other state out of state have to pay the full boat. The point is, why are we subsidizing? Not that they can’t go. They can go. They just have to borrow money, find other sources to be able to go. And why should they be given preferential treatment as an illegal in this country? That’s what we’re saying.

PAUL:

And, also, once you have these data banks, the data banks means that everybody is going to be in the data bank. You say, oh, no, the data bank’s there for the illegals. But everybody’s in the data bank. That’s national ID card. If you care about your personal liberty, you’ll be cautious when you feel comfortable, blame all the illegal immigrants for everything. What you need to do is attack their benefits: no free education, no free subsidies, no citizenship, no birth-right citizenship.

It is my opinion, that if the statements by these candidates are repeated throughout the contest for President by the GOP nominee, the US citizens with a Mexican heritage will not vote for the GOP candidate. Let’s address the fence issue as it will be seen by these voters. The fence, to many of them, is akin to the Berlin Wall.  It is seen as a means of blocking their view of Mexico, a bad place. The Berlin Wall was built to keep the Berliners in the communist sector from escaping to the West. The East Germans justified the building of the wall to its citizens as protection to keep them from seeing all the “monsters” in the West. No one has ever explained to my satisfaction, why securing the US border with Mexico without the fence is so terribly wrong. A US President can command his Secretary of Defense to deploy the necessary aerial surveillance assets and rapid deployment troops to stop movements of smugglers in Mexico attempting to illegally bring cargoes of drugs and humans across the border into the US. This way of securing the border can be done, and our US citizens from a Mexican heritage might support it, whereas they would not accept a fence.

Next, I want to address the Texas in-state tuition status. By law, every state must provide illegal children with a public education for grades K-12. The illegals are paying the same taxes that every Texan is paying. The children of illegals are getting taught in the same manner in grades K-12 as their classmates who are US citizens. The Texas state government can not make any laws about naturalization or deportation. Only the US Congress can legislate those laws. The Texas state government can make laws about in-state status, and by a large majority, they made a law that the illegals who have been attending Texas public schools for over three years will pay the same tuition as their classmates who are US citizens. The notion that they are getting a free subsidy or that their illegal status requires they should be made to pay more than their classmates pay is offensive to US citizens with a Mexican heritage. Ron Paul’s statement, blaming illegal immigrants for everything, sounds too much like what Germans were saying about the Jews in the 1930’s.

I realize that the US and Germany are completely different countries, and what happened in Germany does not mean that it will happen here.  But it is important to remember the lessons of history, and Republicans must be careful regarding any strategy that could cost them dearly in getting people to vote for a Republican candidate in the future.

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

9 COMMENTS

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9 COMMENTS

  1. Good post, Pil. My #1 reason this doesn’t upset me: It doesn’t upset the people of TX.

    Apparently they are willing to allow all people who live in their state to go to state schools at state rates. If they didn’t agree, Perry would not have been representing the people of TX well, but they do. For me? Case closed.

    • Agreed, Q & Pil –

      To me there are several things to ponder–one is rights of citizenship versus rights of residency. When Texas made its decision, it seems to have said, we do not care where you were born. All of the 13,500 would have in-state tuition if they had crossed the border in the womb. For example.

      Where does Perry stand on birth-right citizenship ?

      Until we fix our nation’s laws, border-state conservative candidates with long term executive office experience will continue to have to justify actions taken within the borders of their states.

      What would Perry do as president about our messed up laws?

      • I agree RH with asking what Perry would do as President if a birthright citizenship bill came to his desk. As a Governor he can’t do a thing about citizenship, but he needs to tell us what he’d do as President. This whole column is not a defense of Rick Perry as much as it is a note of caution to the GOP.

        • I got that, Pil. Your columns are good for just us folks who want the best nominee. Nothing in the debates has moved Perry off my list. It is up to all the candidates to make truthful cases to the people, and then we can decide.

  2. I do think that it is misleading to refer to eligibility for in-state tuition as a subsidy or taxpayer/government-funded benefit and that Mitt Romney especially is being inconsistent with his 10th Amendment rights stand on ObamaCare by saying “it” (Texas law) should not be allowed in the area of the treatment of illegals brought here as minors. The flaw in the argument is that the opponents of the Texas law are presuming that legal American non-Texans have some sort of right to pay to pay a lesser amount to attend Texas schools. They don’t.

    But my greatest agreement with your column is in affirming that the USA is certainly not the Germany whether it be the Weimar Republic, Third Reich, Communist puppet of the USSR or today’s Socialist Democrat version. Although I would say that under Obama generally and academia more specifically the gap between the latter and present day Texas, America and academia, the gap grows smaller!

    We are most unlike those that exterminated Christians, Jews and all identified enemies of the state and that later built a wall to prevent a mass exodus from tyranny due to the fact that we grant 20+ years of appeals before executing cop-killing murderers caught in the act by 39 eye-witnesses and 911 conspirators; and have never had any party propose to build a wall to keep citizens confined like slaves.

    The fences now standing in Texas and California do not prevent persons of any heritage on this side of the border from leaving the US any time due solely to their free will to visit and stay in Mexico, much less merely look at the vistas of same and no one in the GOP has ever suggested building a fence that would prevent same.

    Any American of Mexican heritage that thinks that are solely misinformed and the best thing conservatives should do is disabuse them of that notion.

    Yes, Republicans that take a strong stand on the Rule of Law with respect to border security will lose votes. Republicans that take a weak stand on same in order to appease voters that have been brainwashed by the Left would lose more votes. And a would-be Republican presidential nominee candidate that suggests that those that favor border fences and oppose in-state tuition for illegals that have attended Texas schools as minors have no heart or are bigoted against persons with regard to last names won’t be the GOP nominee and shouldn’t be.

    Perry should apologize for those statements and I am sure he will because while he well knows the size of the uninformed Mexican-American voting block, he surely also knows that the size of the European-American vote in the 2008 electorate was around 80% and that they don’t appreciate being labeled as heartless bigots any more by Texas Governors than they do by Michael Moore.

    Why would be securing the border without a fence be “so terribly wrong”? It may not be, but a number of factors suggest that it would be much more problematic than with a fence due to the exponential increase in confrontations that would be engaged in by greatly increased numbers of troops.

    I can understand why even the informed of any heritage would not like the possible Berlin-like wall symbolic effect of the presence of a fence, but how much worse would be the symbolic effect of scores of pictures of dead Mexicans that tried to run the gauntlet and sneak past border patrols? A fence removes gauntlets thru which to run.

    The White House grounds has boundary patrols. it also has a fence. 2+2=4

    One thing the US does have in common with all of the Germanys of the past 100+ years is a leftist propaganda machine that slanders conservatives.

    Mr Perry needs to learn to defend his policy positions without aping that leftist machine.

    I do agree that the GOP needs to be careful with its rhetoric in this regard. But polls show that support for Obama, who brags of deporting more illegals than all previous presidents combined, is way down. And I think the eventual GOP nominee will be strong on border security and on fair treatment for those we have acquiesced in the presence of for so long.

    I would also add that while I do think the 14th Amendment has been misinterpreted to be thought as REQUIRING birth right citizenship, it is also true that the Constitution allows Congress to define naturalization and expand citizenship rights. But I don’t think now would be a good time to push for a change in a policy in place for 140+ years especially when the ObamaDepression is serving to stem the tide of illegal immigration on economic grounds.

    More later

    • You make a lot of great points. I know from phone conversations that you’re not seeing Ron Paul win the nomination. He is the one who was most inflammatory with his ‘blame all the illegal immigrants for everything’ line. LUR had a private conversation with a Mexican-American about how unions want to turn them all into leftist progressives. The guy laughed and replied. They are pro-life, Catholic, go to church, hard-working and thrifty. If it wasn’t for the immigration issue, they’d be Republican. The Democrats are using the issue to drive a wedge.

      • That paragraph of Ron Paul’s disjointed and hurried language is not representative of his actual views. He is arguing for the E-verify that most conservatives support and when he says “you feel comfortable, blame all…” what he means, given what I have heard him and others say before, is that the way to stop the paranoia and racism is to simply have the e-verify. His use of the word attack is not venal. He is really arguing that the best way to deal with the situation is through welfare benefit attraction and not mass deportation, which i think is a red herring, but in any event, Ron Paul is saying what most conservatives say now and what American policy was for all of our history until the late 60s, ie We didn’t have a huge welfare state and for immigrants, they could only come if they could prove they would NOT be a charge of the state.

        Liberals don’t like that policy and many are probably of Mexican-American heritage.

        Tough.

        But I do agree that we should try and not alienate more voters than we have to while upholding conservative principles. I think many of these issues are arguable esp at the state level with a federal government awol from its border duties.

        But one thing I know is not legitimate, and that is any analogy between any Republican on that stage and evil German regimes of the past.

  1. Good post, Pil. My #1 reason this doesn’t upset me: It doesn’t upset the people of TX.

    Apparently they are willing to allow all people who live in their state to go to state schools at state rates. If they didn’t agree, Perry would not have been representing the people of TX well, but they do. For me? Case closed.

    • Agreed, Q & Pil –

      To me there are several things to ponder–one is rights of citizenship versus rights of residency. When Texas made its decision, it seems to have said, we do not care where you were born. All of the 13,500 would have in-state tuition if they had crossed the border in the womb. For example.

      Where does Perry stand on birth-right citizenship ?

      Until we fix our nation’s laws, border-state conservative candidates with long term executive office experience will continue to have to justify actions taken within the borders of their states.

      What would Perry do as president about our messed up laws?

      • I agree RH with asking what Perry would do as President if a birthright citizenship bill came to his desk. As a Governor he can’t do a thing about citizenship, but he needs to tell us what he’d do as President. This whole column is not a defense of Rick Perry as much as it is a note of caution to the GOP.

        • I got that, Pil. Your columns are good for just us folks who want the best nominee. Nothing in the debates has moved Perry off my list. It is up to all the candidates to make truthful cases to the people, and then we can decide.

  2. I do think that it is misleading to refer to eligibility for in-state tuition as a subsidy or taxpayer/government-funded benefit and that Mitt Romney especially is being inconsistent with his 10th Amendment rights stand on ObamaCare by saying “it” (Texas law) should not be allowed in the area of the treatment of illegals brought here as minors. The flaw in the argument is that the opponents of the Texas law are presuming that legal American non-Texans have some sort of right to pay to pay a lesser amount to attend Texas schools. They don’t.

    But my greatest agreement with your column is in affirming that the USA is certainly not the Germany whether it be the Weimar Republic, Third Reich, Communist puppet of the USSR or today’s Socialist Democrat version. Although I would say that under Obama generally and academia more specifically the gap between the latter and present day Texas, America and academia, the gap grows smaller!

    We are most unlike those that exterminated Christians, Jews and all identified enemies of the state and that later built a wall to prevent a mass exodus from tyranny due to the fact that we grant 20+ years of appeals before executing cop-killing murderers caught in the act by 39 eye-witnesses and 911 conspirators; and have never had any party propose to build a wall to keep citizens confined like slaves.

    The fences now standing in Texas and California do not prevent persons of any heritage on this side of the border from leaving the US any time due solely to their free will to visit and stay in Mexico, much less merely look at the vistas of same and no one in the GOP has ever suggested building a fence that would prevent same.

    Any American of Mexican heritage that thinks that are solely misinformed and the best thing conservatives should do is disabuse them of that notion.

    Yes, Republicans that take a strong stand on the Rule of Law with respect to border security will lose votes. Republicans that take a weak stand on same in order to appease voters that have been brainwashed by the Left would lose more votes. And a would-be Republican presidential nominee candidate that suggests that those that favor border fences and oppose in-state tuition for illegals that have attended Texas schools as minors have no heart or are bigoted against persons with regard to last names won’t be the GOP nominee and shouldn’t be.

    Perry should apologize for those statements and I am sure he will because while he well knows the size of the uninformed Mexican-American voting block, he surely also knows that the size of the European-American vote in the 2008 electorate was around 80% and that they don’t appreciate being labeled as heartless bigots any more by Texas Governors than they do by Michael Moore.

    Why would be securing the border without a fence be “so terribly wrong”? It may not be, but a number of factors suggest that it would be much more problematic than with a fence due to the exponential increase in confrontations that would be engaged in by greatly increased numbers of troops.

    I can understand why even the informed of any heritage would not like the possible Berlin-like wall symbolic effect of the presence of a fence, but how much worse would be the symbolic effect of scores of pictures of dead Mexicans that tried to run the gauntlet and sneak past border patrols? A fence removes gauntlets thru which to run.

    The White House grounds has boundary patrols. it also has a fence. 2+2=4

    One thing the US does have in common with all of the Germanys of the past 100+ years is a leftist propaganda machine that slanders conservatives.

    Mr Perry needs to learn to defend his policy positions without aping that leftist machine.

    I do agree that the GOP needs to be careful with its rhetoric in this regard. But polls show that support for Obama, who brags of deporting more illegals than all previous presidents combined, is way down. And I think the eventual GOP nominee will be strong on border security and on fair treatment for those we have acquiesced in the presence of for so long.

    I would also add that while I do think the 14th Amendment has been misinterpreted to be thought as REQUIRING birth right citizenship, it is also true that the Constitution allows Congress to define naturalization and expand citizenship rights. But I don’t think now would be a good time to push for a change in a policy in place for 140+ years especially when the ObamaDepression is serving to stem the tide of illegal immigration on economic grounds.

    More later

    • You make a lot of great points. I know from phone conversations that you’re not seeing Ron Paul win the nomination. He is the one who was most inflammatory with his ‘blame all the illegal immigrants for everything’ line. LUR had a private conversation with a Mexican-American about how unions want to turn them all into leftist progressives. The guy laughed and replied. They are pro-life, Catholic, go to church, hard-working and thrifty. If it wasn’t for the immigration issue, they’d be Republican. The Democrats are using the issue to drive a wedge.

      • That paragraph of Ron Paul’s disjointed and hurried language is not representative of his actual views. He is arguing for the E-verify that most conservatives support and when he says “you feel comfortable, blame all…” what he means, given what I have heard him and others say before, is that the way to stop the paranoia and racism is to simply have the e-verify. His use of the word attack is not venal. He is really arguing that the best way to deal with the situation is through welfare benefit attraction and not mass deportation, which i think is a red herring, but in any event, Ron Paul is saying what most conservatives say now and what American policy was for all of our history until the late 60s, ie We didn’t have a huge welfare state and for immigrants, they could only come if they could prove they would NOT be a charge of the state.

        Liberals don’t like that policy and many are probably of Mexican-American heritage.

        Tough.

        But I do agree that we should try and not alienate more voters than we have to while upholding conservative principles. I think many of these issues are arguable esp at the state level with a federal government awol from its border duties.

        But one thing I know is not legitimate, and that is any analogy between any Republican on that stage and evil German regimes of the past.

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