Friday, September 17, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesPutting The Person Back In 'Personal'

Putting The Person Back In ‘Personal’

 

Some educators are still old school, it seems:

“Cursive handwriting has been omitted from the Common Core State Standards, the new curriculum standard that more than 40 states adopted last summer.” — The Associated Press

“Beginning this fall, Indiana’s State Department of Education will no longer require public schools to teach cursive writing. Instead, students will be expected to become proficient in keyboarding, a skill, some educators say, that is more useful in today’s world.

As an educator who has taught both communications and English classes, I am saddened by this news, for it marks the passing of an important method of communication. I prided myself on being one of those (annoying to some, I’m sure) instructors who insisted upon grammatically correct sentences, written in a legible hand.”

While Ms. Preest and her colleagues are at the present moment concerned with writing, and reading, we do hope that this might be a takeoff point for a renaissance of other waning arts and skills, such as history, critical thinking, Western Civilization and traditional civics.

Oh, and did we mention……Romance?

“As I write this letter
Send my love to you
(You know I want you to) Remember that I’ll always
Be in love with you”

p.s. I Love You

 

bobmontgomery
Poor. No advanced degrees. Unorganized. Feeble. Disjointed. Random. Past it. .... Intrigued, Interested, Patriotic and Lucky.

5 COMMENTS

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5 COMMENTS

  1. They’re wrong, keyboarding may be a useful technical skill, but it doesn’t develop the areas of the brain vital for creativity, imagination, critical thinking, the arts, etc. Consider how you can give a child sophisticated toys, and the next thing you see is that they’re in the cupboard banging on pots and pans, or going zoom, zoom with a tiny toy car. The brain has to be stimulated (all parts) to realize its maximum potential. Closing off one part to edify selectively, another part, is harmful to mankind in the long run.

    • I have written many a song lyric or a poem in longhand, but very few on a keyboard. I have no proof for why, but suspect it has something to do with the difference between stroking a keyboard with my fingers and moving my entire body as required to scribble something in the pad on my lap.

  2. Heh. I’m so out of shape thanks to the keyboard the only thing I use cursive for on checks is the signature. Not to say we shouldn’t have cursive writing. Penguin is correct. It’s the fine motor skills that need hammering and this is a part of education and brain stimulation.

    But I’m the wrong person to ask. I’m still having trouble figuring out those math questions Perry has on the log-in here. 😀

  1. They’re wrong, keyboarding may be a useful technical skill, but it doesn’t develop the areas of the brain vital for creativity, imagination, critical thinking, the arts, etc. Consider how you can give a child sophisticated toys, and the next thing you see is that they’re in the cupboard banging on pots and pans, or going zoom, zoom with a tiny toy car. The brain has to be stimulated (all parts) to realize its maximum potential. Closing off one part to edify selectively, another part, is harmful to mankind in the long run.

    • I have written many a song lyric or a poem in longhand, but very few on a keyboard. I have no proof for why, but suspect it has something to do with the difference between stroking a keyboard with my fingers and moving my entire body as required to scribble something in the pad on my lap.

  2. Heh. I’m so out of shape thanks to the keyboard the only thing I use cursive for on checks is the signature. Not to say we shouldn’t have cursive writing. Penguin is correct. It’s the fine motor skills that need hammering and this is a part of education and brain stimulation.

    But I’m the wrong person to ask. I’m still having trouble figuring out those math questions Perry has on the log-in here. 😀

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