Sunday, September 19, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesIf Voter ID Is Racist, So Is Voter Fraud

If Voter ID Is Racist, So Is Voter Fraud

I know the NAACP and the Democrats like to challenge having identification at the voting booth as being racist which brings to mind a very real question, is voting fraud racist as well? Yes, yes it is and its a felony too. The bottom line on ID is quite simple, when the NAACP intimates that somehow only blacks cannot quite get to the DMV for ID they are minimizing the ability of people with dark skin to get up and sign up at a building anywhere in their respective cities. They are saying that people of color are ignorant and stupid and yet when almost 70+% of people of color work and thereby must have ID to do so, I would say their characterization is one built on racism. When you use a whole swath of people as an example of laziness and ignorance you are the racist in the room. It is obvious the entire argument over ID at the voting booth is an attempt to subvert the votes of blacks, whites, hispanics and every other race in the United States of America, because when one person who illegally takes the action of voting either by doing it multiple times or they have a record and are not allowed to vote, what they do is excise a legal voter’s vote There Are 100s Of These Cases Every Year

While NAACP President Benjamin Jealous lashed out at new state laws requiring photo ID for voting, an NAACP executive sits in prison, sentenced for carrying out a massive voter fraud scheme.

In a story ignored by the national media, in April a Tunica County, Miss., jury convicted NAACP official Lessadolla Sowers on 10 counts of fraudulently casting absentee ballots. Sowers is identified on an NAACP website as a member of the Tunica County NAACP Executive Committee.

Sowers received a five-year prison term for each of the 10 counts, but Circuit Court Judge Charles Webster permitted Sowers to serve those terms concurrently, according to the Tunica Times, the only media outlet to cover the sentencing.

“This crime cuts against the fabric of our free society,” Judge Webster said.

Sowers was found guilty of voting in the names of Carrie Collins, Walter Howard, Sheena Shelton, Alberta Pickett, Draper Cotton and Eddie Davis. She was also convicted of voting in the names of four dead persons: James L. Young, Dora Price, Dorothy Harris, and David Ross.

In the trial, forensic scientist Bo Scales testified that Sowers’s DNA was found on the inner seals of five envelopes containing absentee ballots.

While we are making Voter ID the law of the land, let us as well stop the practice of absentee voting, it is there you will find the largest fraud of all. What the Wisconsin vote on the Supreme Court Justice found was that if a Conservative area gave their numbers late and or last, the Democrat areas could not ascertain how many to lie about having, it is a complete and utter fraud going on in the Democrat districts around the Country. The Democrats well know the only way they can win is to cheat because Americans don’t want their brand of governing and so we must fight back and work in our States and Nationally to bring Voter ID across the land.

JadedByPolitics
Whoever has his enemy at his mercy & does not destroy him is his own enemy

17 COMMENTS

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17 COMMENTS

  1. Agree but disagree on the absentee ballots. I can go for that with some exceptions, such as our military . I’m sure that there are other exceptions but that is the one that came to mind right off the top of my head but what happens these days is way out of hand.

    The military is being disenfranchised in the voting process as it is. I remember well not being able to vote as a military spouse, not just while overseas but here in the states as well because I did not reside, at the time, in the state in which I was supposed to vote (home of record). From all news accounts during every election cycle that hasn’t changed, it seems.

    I dislike early voting as much as Mr. Riggio. I don’t trust it and never have and 2010 showed me, in microcosm, why.

    The flood in Nashville was used as a pretext for massive fraud at one polling place (others reported the same from their direct experiences). Granted the area was affected by flooding but nowhere near what was claimed to justify what went on. Well over 2000 votes in one precinct (an entire district here ideally has only 1870 people in it) and overwhelmingly Democrat victories.

    Extrapolate from that and convince me there wasn’t massive fraud going on with early voting, too.

    • The military should be on computers, there is no reason with all the secrets etc that our military and government have on computers and the amount of money spent for protection that they should not be able to log in and vote but in the case that they shouldn’t that to me should be the ONLY reason for absentee ballots, there is just to much fraud involved as well as early voting, absolutely NOT, if you cannot go vote on the day that is set up every 2-4 years then you give away your right to vote.

      • The pentagon is regularly hacked. What is spent on security wouldn’t prevent voter fraud. It’s worth discussion but when I with my tiny little business have to block hundreds of IPs from other countries(mainly countries that are not our friends ) on a daily basis, I wouldn’t trust a computerized voting system any more than I do early voting.

        I’d hardly think we should come to the notice of these countries, so if my crumb is enough to attract their attention, how much of a carrot is the Pentagon and other federal agencies? Not to mention private businesses that hold private information in databases.

        No, I don’t think computerized is the way to go for military votes, either. I’m not sure there will ever be an ideal system.

        • Steph, I don’t know what kind of system is currently being used by our military abroad, but it wouldn’t have to be done via the Internet. It is possible to set up stand-alone terminals programmed to save the data to memory device only. The program could also just give outcomes of the votes, i.e. tally of who the votes are for. Maybe each location could be assigned a barcode, and then barcode along with tallies could be either faxed or transmitted.

          But like I said, I don’t know enough about our current system to do a comparison. I do think there are probably plenty of options that could be considered that haven’t been considered.

  2. On military voting, the problem lies with the secretaries of state and some county officials who fail to get out their ballots early enough. The entire process needs to be turned over to the military branches, with military ballots being recognized back home much as military passports are used worldwide.
    Military people, including dependents, are quite used to doing things ‘by the numbers’ and, if given a chance to vote in a system run by their service branch, would do so in a timely, precise fashion. It needn’t be an electronic system, but some type of batch operation with the ballots flowing back to each person’s home district is clearly doable. Of course, then all the military’s votes would count, which presents somewhat of a problem for one party in particular.

    • mriggio, I believe it is doable as well. With all the advancements that have been made in technology, there is absolutely no excuse for using an outdated system that deprives our military of the opportunity to vote.

      Question is, where do changes have to begin? What would be the first step? Is this something that the DOD would consider contracting with private sector to find a program or system to achieve?

      • This could get complicated. Ideally, a legal system would be put in place for the military to securely fetch the local ballot (electronically) from the serviceman’s/dependent’s home-of-record county. It would have to be done securely, with the military message serving as a bonafide absentee ballot request. The hang up locally is usually that the elections folks have enough headaches preparing the ballots properly for the local voters, given late primaries and other last minute events leading up to the election. But once the service branch obtained the ballot from the local jurisdiction, the rest should be pretty easy, getting the completed votes back to the precinct, securely. But with the states being in charge of their elections, setting up a standardized, secure system might be a heavy lift. And as my old system security instructor used to say, whatever one guy can think up to secure things, another guy can figure a way around it.

        • Yeah, sounds like the system really is outdated. So it’s getting the forms from the local precincts that ends up being the bottleneck in the process?

          I know what you mean about the security issues and people finding a way to get around them, but there has to be a better way to go about this than what we have. If I find out anything, I’ll send it back this way

  3. If we are going to continue using some sort of absentee ballot system, it would be better and prevent more fraud to incorporate a type of biometrics (such as a thumb print) into the ID portion of the process. Unless Dems plan to dig up corpses, this would eliminate the dead vote.

      • I thought they would be. For those and other usages, to prevent duplication of forms that could be submitted year after year to generate voter fraud, it wouldn’t be that difficult to use a program that randomly changes the file name of an absentee voter form from year to year. Or, colored ink could be used for biometrics rather than black ink, changing the color from year to year.

        We do have a lot of options. It sounds like our current system is just very badly outdated.

  4. When you couple the attacks on Voter ID with the trend to eliminate precinct polling places and go to Wal Mart Vote Centers, soon Van Jones will have a good chance at succeeding Barfack Obama in 2016.

  5. $peciallist, that button at the top of Jaded’s post belongs on a CafePress shirt.

    A shirt that could only be worn by large, tough men, because members of the Party Of The Little Man would assault the rest of us, but still…

  6. I don’t want to eliminate absentee voting unless we allow voting over a week or more per election as some people travel for a living.

    I know when I worked as an examiner, it would have been impossible for me to go to the polling place, as it would be for truck drivers, etc.

    I do agree that the arguments against voter ID are 100% racist. Why is it that some people think that people with browner skin than the rest of us are somehow or another incapable of living normal lives?

    • The entire argument is bogus on it’s face. For Pete’s sake, I have to show an ID (I’m 62!!) just to buy a pack of smokes at the gas station. As bad as an alcohol purchase. Yet no one is screaming how hard it is for a certain segment of society to buy those things, right?

  1. Agree but disagree on the absentee ballots. I can go for that with some exceptions, such as our military . I’m sure that there are other exceptions but that is the one that came to mind right off the top of my head but what happens these days is way out of hand.

    The military is being disenfranchised in the voting process as it is. I remember well not being able to vote as a military spouse, not just while overseas but here in the states as well because I did not reside, at the time, in the state in which I was supposed to vote (home of record). From all news accounts during every election cycle that hasn’t changed, it seems.

    I dislike early voting as much as Mr. Riggio. I don’t trust it and never have and 2010 showed me, in microcosm, why.

    The flood in Nashville was used as a pretext for massive fraud at one polling place (others reported the same from their direct experiences). Granted the area was affected by flooding but nowhere near what was claimed to justify what went on. Well over 2000 votes in one precinct (an entire district here ideally has only 1870 people in it) and overwhelmingly Democrat victories.

    Extrapolate from that and convince me there wasn’t massive fraud going on with early voting, too.

    • The military should be on computers, there is no reason with all the secrets etc that our military and government have on computers and the amount of money spent for protection that they should not be able to log in and vote but in the case that they shouldn’t that to me should be the ONLY reason for absentee ballots, there is just to much fraud involved as well as early voting, absolutely NOT, if you cannot go vote on the day that is set up every 2-4 years then you give away your right to vote.

      • The pentagon is regularly hacked. What is spent on security wouldn’t prevent voter fraud. It’s worth discussion but when I with my tiny little business have to block hundreds of IPs from other countries(mainly countries that are not our friends ) on a daily basis, I wouldn’t trust a computerized voting system any more than I do early voting.

        I’d hardly think we should come to the notice of these countries, so if my crumb is enough to attract their attention, how much of a carrot is the Pentagon and other federal agencies? Not to mention private businesses that hold private information in databases.

        No, I don’t think computerized is the way to go for military votes, either. I’m not sure there will ever be an ideal system.

        • Steph, I don’t know what kind of system is currently being used by our military abroad, but it wouldn’t have to be done via the Internet. It is possible to set up stand-alone terminals programmed to save the data to memory device only. The program could also just give outcomes of the votes, i.e. tally of who the votes are for. Maybe each location could be assigned a barcode, and then barcode along with tallies could be either faxed or transmitted.

          But like I said, I don’t know enough about our current system to do a comparison. I do think there are probably plenty of options that could be considered that haven’t been considered.

  2. On military voting, the problem lies with the secretaries of state and some county officials who fail to get out their ballots early enough. The entire process needs to be turned over to the military branches, with military ballots being recognized back home much as military passports are used worldwide.
    Military people, including dependents, are quite used to doing things ‘by the numbers’ and, if given a chance to vote in a system run by their service branch, would do so in a timely, precise fashion. It needn’t be an electronic system, but some type of batch operation with the ballots flowing back to each person’s home district is clearly doable. Of course, then all the military’s votes would count, which presents somewhat of a problem for one party in particular.

    • mriggio, I believe it is doable as well. With all the advancements that have been made in technology, there is absolutely no excuse for using an outdated system that deprives our military of the opportunity to vote.

      Question is, where do changes have to begin? What would be the first step? Is this something that the DOD would consider contracting with private sector to find a program or system to achieve?

      • This could get complicated. Ideally, a legal system would be put in place for the military to securely fetch the local ballot (electronically) from the serviceman’s/dependent’s home-of-record county. It would have to be done securely, with the military message serving as a bonafide absentee ballot request. The hang up locally is usually that the elections folks have enough headaches preparing the ballots properly for the local voters, given late primaries and other last minute events leading up to the election. But once the service branch obtained the ballot from the local jurisdiction, the rest should be pretty easy, getting the completed votes back to the precinct, securely. But with the states being in charge of their elections, setting up a standardized, secure system might be a heavy lift. And as my old system security instructor used to say, whatever one guy can think up to secure things, another guy can figure a way around it.

        • Yeah, sounds like the system really is outdated. So it’s getting the forms from the local precincts that ends up being the bottleneck in the process?

          I know what you mean about the security issues and people finding a way to get around them, but there has to be a better way to go about this than what we have. If I find out anything, I’ll send it back this way

  3. If we are going to continue using some sort of absentee ballot system, it would be better and prevent more fraud to incorporate a type of biometrics (such as a thumb print) into the ID portion of the process. Unless Dems plan to dig up corpses, this would eliminate the dead vote.

      • I thought they would be. For those and other usages, to prevent duplication of forms that could be submitted year after year to generate voter fraud, it wouldn’t be that difficult to use a program that randomly changes the file name of an absentee voter form from year to year. Or, colored ink could be used for biometrics rather than black ink, changing the color from year to year.

        We do have a lot of options. It sounds like our current system is just very badly outdated.

  4. When you couple the attacks on Voter ID with the trend to eliminate precinct polling places and go to Wal Mart Vote Centers, soon Van Jones will have a good chance at succeeding Barfack Obama in 2016.

  5. $peciallist, that button at the top of Jaded’s post belongs on a CafePress shirt.

    A shirt that could only be worn by large, tough men, because members of the Party Of The Little Man would assault the rest of us, but still…

  6. I don’t want to eliminate absentee voting unless we allow voting over a week or more per election as some people travel for a living.

    I know when I worked as an examiner, it would have been impossible for me to go to the polling place, as it would be for truck drivers, etc.

    I do agree that the arguments against voter ID are 100% racist. Why is it that some people think that people with browner skin than the rest of us are somehow or another incapable of living normal lives?

    • The entire argument is bogus on it’s face. For Pete’s sake, I have to show an ID (I’m 62!!) just to buy a pack of smokes at the gas station. As bad as an alcohol purchase. Yet no one is screaming how hard it is for a certain segment of society to buy those things, right?

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