Tuesday, September 21, 2021
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Private Herman Cain Interview Clarifying His Stand on Islam

With due credit to theothermccain

This was an exclusive article, and in all fairness to those who obtained it, I will simply copy a portion of it here along with the video.

During a private event Sunday with supporters in Bethesda, Maryland, Republican presidential candidate spoke frankly abouthis opposition to a proposed mosque in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Cain said that one Tennessee attorney representing opponents of the mosque told him that the controversial project is being supported by the Muslim Brotherhood.

Cain’s public opposition to the proposed Tennessee mosque, as well as his March statement that he would not be comfortable appointing Muslims to his presidential cabinet, have been criticized by many liberals and also by some Republicans. However, the Atlanta businessman told his Maryland supporters during a question-and-answer session at a private home in suburban Montgomery County, he considers Islam not merely a religion, but also a political system that does not recognize separation of church and state. His remarks were greeted with applause.

About 80 supporters — including aides to two Republican members of the Maryland legislature — attended the Bethesda event. Maryland’s 2012 GOP primary is April 3, and Cain’s visit to the state could be seen as evidence that his campaign is planning a long-term nationwide strategy toward winning the Republican nomination. New party rules for 2012 have ended “winner take all” delegate apportionment in most states, which means that the GOP presidential primary campaign will likely continue well beyond the first round of early voting in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina.

Mr. Cain is speaking the truth.  Roughly 80% of the content of the Muslim religion is based on the social/political/economic/legal aspects commonly referred to as Sharia law, which is, conceptually speaking, in direct opposition to the Constitution of the United States.

On those points where Sharia law and the U.S. Constitution may be in conflict with each other, believers of the Muslim faith have to make a choice when it comes to prioritizing their loyalties.

Will their first loyalty be to the nation or to the religion?

With what we know about organizations such as the Muslim Brotherhood, what does this indicate about what the higher of the two priorities will be?

 

 

 

11 COMMENTS

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11 COMMENTS

  1. It is probably impossible to be a devout Muslim believer in the clear tenets taught in the Koran and Hadith (sp?) and an American advocate of the values and principles embodied in the Constitution and Declaration. However, there are many conservatives that call themselves Muslims that are patriotic and whose values are consistent with the Judeo-Christian values upon which much of our law is based.

    I do think Cain needs to do a better job of explaining his trepidations re cabinet appointments, as well as community opposition to mosques. The free exercise clause does not mean that one is entitles to build specific churches, temples and mosques in specific locations and to conduct any and all activities in such specific places. For instance, many zoning laws prohibit the sounding of church bells…more later

    • Mike, I agree wholeheartedly on your point that Cain could do better than he has in presenting why he takes the stand that he does on these issues. After hearing what he had to say in this interview, I did find myself in agreement with his viewpoint. Muslims could find themselves with divided loyalties, and it is next to impossible to predict how they would respond, depending on how much pressure they might face within the Muslim community.

      I remember seeing a video that included two relatively well-known speakers who have strong knowledge of the religion, and they said that Muslims in America who can and do respect our laws as being equal or greater to Sharia law may find themselves having to make the choice to separate away from the more extreme element of the religion by establishing a distinct faction of the religion, but that it has to come from Muslims to do this.

    • The truth is that our nation is founded on a Judeo-Christian proposition that all are created equal and endowed by our Creator with inalienable rights. The proposition does not say all Judeo-Christians are created equal – it says all. If there are people who do not wish to abide by this proposition, and try to, by force, make everyone else reject this proposition, then they should go live in Iran or Saudi Arabia. If observant muslims can not accept the proposition because they will not accept women and infidels as their equal, then that is not Cain’s problem. That is their problem.

  1. It is probably impossible to be a devout Muslim believer in the clear tenets taught in the Koran and Hadith (sp?) and an American advocate of the values and principles embodied in the Constitution and Declaration. However, there are many conservatives that call themselves Muslims that are patriotic and whose values are consistent with the Judeo-Christian values upon which much of our law is based.

    I do think Cain needs to do a better job of explaining his trepidations re cabinet appointments, as well as community opposition to mosques. The free exercise clause does not mean that one is entitles to build specific churches, temples and mosques in specific locations and to conduct any and all activities in such specific places. For instance, many zoning laws prohibit the sounding of church bells…more later

    • Mike, I agree wholeheartedly on your point that Cain could do better than he has in presenting why he takes the stand that he does on these issues. After hearing what he had to say in this interview, I did find myself in agreement with his viewpoint. Muslims could find themselves with divided loyalties, and it is next to impossible to predict how they would respond, depending on how much pressure they might face within the Muslim community.

      I remember seeing a video that included two relatively well-known speakers who have strong knowledge of the religion, and they said that Muslims in America who can and do respect our laws as being equal or greater to Sharia law may find themselves having to make the choice to separate away from the more extreme element of the religion by establishing a distinct faction of the religion, but that it has to come from Muslims to do this.

    • The truth is that our nation is founded on a Judeo-Christian proposition that all are created equal and endowed by our Creator with inalienable rights. The proposition does not say all Judeo-Christians are created equal – it says all. If there are people who do not wish to abide by this proposition, and try to, by force, make everyone else reject this proposition, then they should go live in Iran or Saudi Arabia. If observant muslims can not accept the proposition because they will not accept women and infidels as their equal, then that is not Cain’s problem. That is their problem.

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