Sunday, September 19, 2021
HomeFeatured EntriesHumanity, or, Where do we get these men?

Humanity, or, Where do we get these men?

A friend who was witness to tornado devastation in her community prompted me to share with you some thoughts.

I am minded that no matter what our bumps and bruises, shames and outrages under the regime, they pale in comparison to what our military and their families go through daily and every moment. I do wish all of my adored Unified Patriots a time that will refresh them and strengthen them. United we stand, and there are no people I’d rather share a website with, or a planet, for that matter.

We surely have our moments of heat and indecision. But here we all are, like bricks and mortar, as was said in Perry White’s first missive to our community. To the last man or woman, as long as we have breath, we know wherefore we fight and what it takes to win.

Some notes on our common humanity:

We have many traditions and legacies. One that comes to mind this day is the universal habit of burial and subsequent honoring of the dead. Today I read that:

Neanderthals were formidable hunters, and are the first people known to have buried their dead, with the oldest known burial site being about 100,000 years old. [These sites] are found throughout Europe and the Middle East.

Our humanity from earliest time is evidenced in many ways. Paul Monk in “Mapping the Future of Argument” wrote that:

Argument mapping, rooted in metaphor, like the first body decorations and cave paintings, the first pictograms and the first poems, is another extraordinary creative leap of the Big Brain.

Perhaps interestingly to our denizens of the tattoo parlor, I find that: “The First Art Was Body Art.”

…we find these 160,000-year-old, four times as old as Europe, implements of ochre that are clearly pencils, so people were decorating one another and themselves and probably mostly each other, because they didn’t have mirrors, so they were probably decorating one another and this was [ ] in a broad sense like when you look at nonhuman primates that groom one another. It’s a way of developing and establishing social contact and social consecutiveness and cohesiveness, so the earliest art really goes back to Southern Africa. We find… A little bit later we find pierced shells in the Serengeti. We find them in North Africa. We find them in the Middle East, so Europe wasn’t really the place where the creative explosion happened. It came along with us into Europe and developed over time to the point where you have the first impressionists 25,000 years ago.

Archaeology and paleoanthropology aside, I’ll get to the point, now. (Finally! You are no doubt saying. Let us not get sidetracked into the labyrinth of artifacts and conjecture, when truths and transcendence are what make us exceptional.)

A woman born in about 1954, who likely had known of many men who returned (and some who never did return) from WWII and even WWI, wrote this anonymously when she was 12 years old, h/t Bob Baxter’s Bomber-Command.info.

Who Are These Men?

Who are these men who march so proud,
Who quietly weep, eyes closed, head bowed?
These are the men who once were boys,
Who missed out on youth and all it’s joys.

Who are these men with aged faces,
Who silently count the empty spaces?
These are the men who gave their all,
Who fought for their country for freedom for all.

Who are these men with sorrowful look
Who can still remember the lives that were took?
These are the men who saw young men die,
The price of peace is always high.

Who are these men who in the midst of pain,
Whispered comfort to those they would not see again?
These are the men whose hands held tomorrow,
Who brought back our future with blood tears and sorrow.

Who are these men who promise to keep
Alive in their hearts the ones God holds asleep?
These are the men to whom I promise again:
‘Veterans’,my friends-I will remember them!

We have been told over and over by veterans that soldiers do not fight for freedom or for their country at the most basic gut level. They fight for the man on their left and the man on their right. As Bernard Chumm reminds us, and as immortalized by Ernie Pyle’s column, in the case of Capt. Waskow, they also fight for their most respected commanders.

“Where do we get these men” can only be answered by each of us individually. For those of the youngest generations, this answer will become increasingly more important as the living memory of the world wars is inexorably extinguished with time. However, the Lord provides and there are many millions of keepers of the flame, and our little corner of cyberspace is evidence of it. Please take the injunction–rest well, peace and grace–to heart. There are dark days ahead and by these remembrances we share, we wish you the heart and the will to carry on.

Here in America now, our lives have become easier and therefore we have allowed ourselves to chase shibboleths like cult worship and Earth idolatry. That way lies vanity, and to insidious decay and worse, tyranny. A tyranny worse than tornadic or economic devastation alone. We will not go there, I firmly believe. We still retain the remnant of our civil society and remain focused on what it takes to restore it fully.

Have we ceased to care about “the other,” those outside ourselves, our own immediate circle, our own tribe, city, state, or nation? Each must answer this; but what matters is what we do to make things right. Our humanity and our faith together call us to do no less.

Our community, those of whom I can say from long association and some of shorter association, as a group, are creative, are opinionated, are grounded on a bedrock of principle and faith in our nation’s founding, and aren’t about to allow the vapid preachings of a “skinny little freak,” per ColdWarrior, to lead our nation further astray from its glorious underpinnings. We watch, learn, grow and most importantly we organize so that together we may be worthy, as was Captain Waskow.

Inspiration, that “fire in the belly,” isn’t really for a single candidate, or even for a single election cycle. No, it is the fire in the belly that overwhelms us when we look into a child’s eye, memorialize our fallen, remember the generations that came before us in the person of a grandparent or parent. Passing the baton links us to the deep past and the distant future. We know each other because we know ourselves, and we will not be parted nor will we be dispirited.

This, too, shall pass: meaning, that the powerful forces gathered by our enemies shall not always rule. And the Bible teaches us that all life is fleeting. It is up to us to make of it what we will.

Behold, thou hast made my days as an handbreadth; and mine age is as nothing before thee: verily every man at his best state is altogether vanity. Selah. Psalm 39:5.

Survival instinct provided by our creator to even the lowliest of his creatures, i.e., “I’ve got mine, so why bother myself about anyone else’s misery” is not a successful long-term strategy. That way lies bestiality (the condition or status of a lower animal.) Rather, I love the example of Ruth:

And Ruth said, Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God:

Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the LORD do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me. Ruth: 16-17.

The golden rule, do unto others as you would have others do unto you, must be reconciled with the ancient code of justice, an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. This people and this nation have found the way to do this reconciliation. Let us restore that ability through carrying out our intentions.

redneck hippie
Kansas native, reformed treehugger. Restore the republic, revive traditional America. Redneck hippie. Blogger since 2007--Accept no substitutes. twitter: @redneckhip

22 COMMENTS

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22 COMMENTS

  1. Beautiful and fitting post RH! Thanks for the interesting body art info! Who’da thunk I was following such an ancient tradition? I have a TV episode about Otzi, the “iceman” recorded, it’s interesting that Europeans were tattooing 5000 years ago. Though even I would think twice about using their methods. I’m not particularly tempted to make my own ink from animal fat and charcoal, much to my customers relief!

    That is a powerful poem, how does a mere girl of 12 come to know such things? She saw things a child should never see, men returning from war, broken and bent. I’m glad she saw it the way she did, I hope writing it was as wonderful a therapy for her as it is for me! Thanks!

    • Thanks, nessa. You are so inside my head right now. The thing is, “the world” was starting to get me down, and when a little birdie told me I needed to write, well, let us just say, writing as therapy is proven one more time. So glad you enjoyed it–you and many others were the inspiration, truly.

      • Memorial Day does that to me too these days. I like your writing as therapy idea, fewer repercussions than the “bar fighting as therapy” idea I was considering. I don’t even drink anymore, it makes it challenging. LOL!

  2. Wonderful post, red. Honor and remember those that died for our freedom. Americans are generous, and none more so than with their blood.

    I don’t know “where” we get these men, but I do believe our faith-based cultural history lends itself to their creation.

    • “Americans are generous, and none more so than with their blood.” Beautifully said, Lady. You have the answer as I think most Americans do, to my question, “where.”

      Our genetic code does not provide the answer to it any more than it tells us why we have a capitalistic, free-market economy and a Constitution that was unique in all the world These things are all based on our moral foundation, our emphasis on faith and family. We have seen what transpires when these are neutered. And so we fight.

  3. RH, your post today is a fine example of the combination of thinking, feeling, believing, knowing and being on display every day here at UP. We are not one-trick ponies, as your username so aptly points out. We are the folk, and there is a richness about the folk that the Ruling Class can only envy. Thanks for being one of us.

    • “there is a richness about the folk that the Ruling Class can only envy.” Great statement, Bob! Glad to hear your reaction. There are things about us as Americans and about us as members here, that are rather undefinable.
      So, you hit on a deep thread, there, by mentioning our richness. Thank you!

  4. Redneck Hippie, I’m in awe!! Why aren’t you writing more often? You have a tremendous way with words that touches both heart, mind and spirit.

    This was a great piece, as have been several others this weekend. Thank you all so much.

    • Agree that the UP’ers have done awesome things for Memorial Day. There will be at least one other that you won’t want to miss, possibly tomorrow. Haven’t written lately and apologize for my laggardness. This one was a cleansing out and you should see my name more often going forward. So sweet of you to comment, but our military, the people of Joplin, MO and you patriots are what make the writing what it is. Thank you for being “one of us.” as Bob said. Your contributions and comments are highly valued, deservedly so!

  5. IIRC that was also a question asked by the admiral in the closing scenes of Michener’s Brigdes at Toko Ri. In that case he was astounded over the class of family-men reservists (pilots, infantry officers) who willingly threw theselves into the Communist invasion period of the Korean War 1950-51 – and incur terrible casualties – until our unwisely-disbanded military could start conscripting again and finally send full units over, 1952-54. But it applies surely to all Americans. When I saw Bachman and Palin roaring defiance at Obama when almost no one else was as early as Feb 2009 – I did have the thought “where do we get such women?” I believe Lady P is right is is happily our culture of Constitution and freedom that has been producing them.

    • You’re probably correct, when I did a search on the phrase, I do recall there was a reference to Toko Ri among the results. I’d heard the question repeated often over the years and always wondered what specific source it had come from, aside from the general awe in which we hold those who served. Searching for a source is how I found the poem.

      Our service people are humble and usually think of themselves as ordinary men in extraordinary circumstances, saying they are just doing their job. Nevertheless, we do have a unique society and culture that encourages the right kind of men and women to do more than the usual things expected. America is most fortunate in her military. May we always deserve them.

  6. Where do we get these men and women…

    From all points of the compass. Some that knew immediately what they were to do with their lives. Others in dire need of direction which they found in the military and in joining, found themselves.

    Some came to escape and others came searching for a purpose.

    The majority become a cohesive force in the service of this country. They are doing a job many of us do not have the stomach to undertake or the physical/mental/emotional stamina to see it to the end.

    War is not a movie or sound byte. It’s a bloody dirty costly business. Something many forget when they come home or don’t.

    Rain drizzled the day I went
    to view the newest gold star,
    no names listed upon the wall
    just a date along side .

    I remember them
    going where ever sent,
    no questions asked
    get the job done.
    …some at great price

    walk through walls
    appear out of nothing
    quick, painless extractions
    they were the best.

    no ticker-tapes or
    joyous reunions
    caught for the viewers
    at 5 and 11
    homecomings were silent
    unnoticed and forgotten

    caught in times reverie
    a voice came from behind
    asking who they were.

    offering him a drink,
    I spoke their names
    so another would know.
    turning to leave, he asks
    “That last space, whose name
    goes there?”

  7. They must have been good people to move you to write so evocatively. Worthy of a repeat appearance as a dispatch, I’m thinking. I felt pretty sure that there was a personal story behind these words. Thank you for sharing.

  1. Beautiful and fitting post RH! Thanks for the interesting body art info! Who’da thunk I was following such an ancient tradition? I have a TV episode about Otzi, the “iceman” recorded, it’s interesting that Europeans were tattooing 5000 years ago. Though even I would think twice about using their methods. I’m not particularly tempted to make my own ink from animal fat and charcoal, much to my customers relief!

    That is a powerful poem, how does a mere girl of 12 come to know such things? She saw things a child should never see, men returning from war, broken and bent. I’m glad she saw it the way she did, I hope writing it was as wonderful a therapy for her as it is for me! Thanks!

    • Thanks, nessa. You are so inside my head right now. The thing is, “the world” was starting to get me down, and when a little birdie told me I needed to write, well, let us just say, writing as therapy is proven one more time. So glad you enjoyed it–you and many others were the inspiration, truly.

      • Memorial Day does that to me too these days. I like your writing as therapy idea, fewer repercussions than the “bar fighting as therapy” idea I was considering. I don’t even drink anymore, it makes it challenging. LOL!

  2. Wonderful post, red. Honor and remember those that died for our freedom. Americans are generous, and none more so than with their blood.

    I don’t know “where” we get these men, but I do believe our faith-based cultural history lends itself to their creation.

    • “Americans are generous, and none more so than with their blood.” Beautifully said, Lady. You have the answer as I think most Americans do, to my question, “where.”

      Our genetic code does not provide the answer to it any more than it tells us why we have a capitalistic, free-market economy and a Constitution that was unique in all the world These things are all based on our moral foundation, our emphasis on faith and family. We have seen what transpires when these are neutered. And so we fight.

  3. RH, your post today is a fine example of the combination of thinking, feeling, believing, knowing and being on display every day here at UP. We are not one-trick ponies, as your username so aptly points out. We are the folk, and there is a richness about the folk that the Ruling Class can only envy. Thanks for being one of us.

    • “there is a richness about the folk that the Ruling Class can only envy.” Great statement, Bob! Glad to hear your reaction. There are things about us as Americans and about us as members here, that are rather undefinable.
      So, you hit on a deep thread, there, by mentioning our richness. Thank you!

  4. Redneck Hippie, I’m in awe!! Why aren’t you writing more often? You have a tremendous way with words that touches both heart, mind and spirit.

    This was a great piece, as have been several others this weekend. Thank you all so much.

    • Agree that the UP’ers have done awesome things for Memorial Day. There will be at least one other that you won’t want to miss, possibly tomorrow. Haven’t written lately and apologize for my laggardness. This one was a cleansing out and you should see my name more often going forward. So sweet of you to comment, but our military, the people of Joplin, MO and you patriots are what make the writing what it is. Thank you for being “one of us.” as Bob said. Your contributions and comments are highly valued, deservedly so!

  5. IIRC that was also a question asked by the admiral in the closing scenes of Michener’s Brigdes at Toko Ri. In that case he was astounded over the class of family-men reservists (pilots, infantry officers) who willingly threw theselves into the Communist invasion period of the Korean War 1950-51 – and incur terrible casualties – until our unwisely-disbanded military could start conscripting again and finally send full units over, 1952-54. But it applies surely to all Americans. When I saw Bachman and Palin roaring defiance at Obama when almost no one else was as early as Feb 2009 – I did have the thought “where do we get such women?” I believe Lady P is right is is happily our culture of Constitution and freedom that has been producing them.

    • You’re probably correct, when I did a search on the phrase, I do recall there was a reference to Toko Ri among the results. I’d heard the question repeated often over the years and always wondered what specific source it had come from, aside from the general awe in which we hold those who served. Searching for a source is how I found the poem.

      Our service people are humble and usually think of themselves as ordinary men in extraordinary circumstances, saying they are just doing their job. Nevertheless, we do have a unique society and culture that encourages the right kind of men and women to do more than the usual things expected. America is most fortunate in her military. May we always deserve them.

  6. Where do we get these men and women…

    From all points of the compass. Some that knew immediately what they were to do with their lives. Others in dire need of direction which they found in the military and in joining, found themselves.

    Some came to escape and others came searching for a purpose.

    The majority become a cohesive force in the service of this country. They are doing a job many of us do not have the stomach to undertake or the physical/mental/emotional stamina to see it to the end.

    War is not a movie or sound byte. It’s a bloody dirty costly business. Something many forget when they come home or don’t.

    Rain drizzled the day I went
    to view the newest gold star,
    no names listed upon the wall
    just a date along side .

    I remember them
    going where ever sent,
    no questions asked
    get the job done.
    …some at great price

    walk through walls
    appear out of nothing
    quick, painless extractions
    they were the best.

    no ticker-tapes or
    joyous reunions
    caught for the viewers
    at 5 and 11
    homecomings were silent
    unnoticed and forgotten

    caught in times reverie
    a voice came from behind
    asking who they were.

    offering him a drink,
    I spoke their names
    so another would know.
    turning to leave, he asks
    “That last space, whose name
    goes there?”

  7. They must have been good people to move you to write so evocatively. Worthy of a repeat appearance as a dispatch, I’m thinking. I felt pretty sure that there was a personal story behind these words. Thank you for sharing.

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