Monday, September 27, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesA tribute to my father, a WWII vet still living

A tribute to my father, a WWII vet still living

Yes, dad, you are 88 years old. You saw unspeakable horrors to ensure the freedom of this country. This video is for you and all others who gave their lives and are still living for the freedom of this country. You saw the pictures of the flag raised at Iwo Jima. You were a radio airman in the Army Air Force in the Pacific theatre and threw up all the while in the plane, bouncing up and down. Did you care? No. Did you cry when your friend’s head was found in a pit in New Guinea? Yes. Did it affect your service to this country? No. Do you still remember your dog tag number? Yes.

I love you.

God Bless you and protect those who serve.

Support our troops.

LadyImpactOhiohttps://www.ladyimpactohio.com
Deplorable Reagan Conservative. Pro-life, pro 2A. Waiting for Obama's "legacy" to be undone. Twitter: @LadyImpactOhio "We the People tell government what to do. It does not tell us."__Ronald Reagan in his farewell speech.

12 COMMENTS

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12 COMMENTS

  1. My Dad served at the tail end of WWII. He got to jump out of planes but nobody was shooting at him because the war ended while he was on a boat en route to Asia. He said it was scary sailing with no lights. Then they announced it had ended. He said he and the rest were happy it was over. He is 85 and thought about taking an honour flight but hasn’t done so.

    The video is great and I’ve always loved the music from that era. Dad always played big band music in the house when I was growing up, which was a welcome relief from my Mom’s C&W (sorry, but I just didn’t like it).

    • There are so many heroes from WW2. They deserve to be remembered, along with all who have served.

      About the WW2 soldier. . . . have you noticed how serious and mature they all looked in pictures from back then? Even the very young among them were grown ups.

      • Absolutely. Someone just reminded me today that my children’s other grandpa, who died from an accident long after leaving the service, was a Sea Bee. I know my ex, who did 4 yrs in the Navy, 2 on an a/c carrier and 2 at a bombing range in FL, so badly had wanted to be a Sea Bee in the tradition of his father. I never got to meet him, as he died just before I met his son.

    • Headed towards the Pacific when the war ended? RedneckH, you truly are one of that special group that can look a one-worlder anti-Nuke Lib pacifist in the eye and say,”Truman’s decision to drop the Bomb no doubt saved my dad’s life” – with conviction.An invassion of the home islands of Japan was going to cost a million US casualties. It would have been horrific for the first-in including your dad. Thank you for this excellent and straight to the point tribute for Memorial Day, and of course I found it on UP.

      • I always envision them, sailing with no lights through the dark ocean, and suddenly having the lights come back on. Yeah, I was thinking that thought you said, just yesterday.

        A similar story of my Mom’s Dad. He joined at the tail end of WWI, got caught in the influenza epidemic and was quarantined to barracks with the other victims. He wrote his mother that he was the only soldier in that barrack to survive the flu. Not all are killed by man, I often think about the reason a whole lot of his progeny are alive walking around today. Fortunes of war.

        As I always say, no matter what the outcome, all who serve are noble, and those who pay their all are honored most of all.

        Thanks, LIO for providing your tribute, your Dad sounds like a good man & I wish both you and him well.

  2. I lost my Dad the week GWB and Don Rumsfeld began ‘Shock & Awe’ on Saddam. Dad had served as a 2Lt co-pilot on a B-17 with the 8th AF out of England. He flew some missions over Germany, raining down death & destruction, until he was shot down, losing some crewmen, but survived and rode out the rest of the conflict in a stalag, a POW camp. He seldom spoke of those experiences, except for a cute story on how we pronounce our surname (NOT how the Nazi interrogators pronounced it) and his dislike for cabbage & rutabagas, which is largely what both he and his captors had to eat, especially as victory drew near. He also disliked the TV show Hogan’s Heroes, found no humor in it whatsoever. My sibs and I miss him greatly.

  3. LIO, my dad was in the AF and served in New Guinea. It’s possible our dads shared a fox hole together because the Japanese regularly bombed the heck out the American positions.

    My dad had a picture of himself with his 3 best friends in New Guinea. He never talked about the war but he did tell me that all three were killed, two of them in non-combat accidents.

    I still remember him looking at that picture and saying “it” was the biggest waste in the world. Dad continued to serve in the Guard for many years after the war. We lost him in ’77 to a car wreck.

    God bless your dad and all the brave souls who have served and a big high five to those serving today.

  4. Many came back with scars you can’t see, as they do from today’s combat zones. Still, those men did indeed save the world, and all owe them gratitude.

    I know you treasure these remaining days with your father, LIO. As you know, I just lost my father-in-law, another one of that generation gone, the likes of which I’m not sure we’ll ever see again.

  1. My Dad served at the tail end of WWII. He got to jump out of planes but nobody was shooting at him because the war ended while he was on a boat en route to Asia. He said it was scary sailing with no lights. Then they announced it had ended. He said he and the rest were happy it was over. He is 85 and thought about taking an honour flight but hasn’t done so.

    The video is great and I’ve always loved the music from that era. Dad always played big band music in the house when I was growing up, which was a welcome relief from my Mom’s C&W (sorry, but I just didn’t like it).

    • There are so many heroes from WW2. They deserve to be remembered, along with all who have served.

      About the WW2 soldier. . . . have you noticed how serious and mature they all looked in pictures from back then? Even the very young among them were grown ups.

      • Absolutely. Someone just reminded me today that my children’s other grandpa, who died from an accident long after leaving the service, was a Sea Bee. I know my ex, who did 4 yrs in the Navy, 2 on an a/c carrier and 2 at a bombing range in FL, so badly had wanted to be a Sea Bee in the tradition of his father. I never got to meet him, as he died just before I met his son.

    • Headed towards the Pacific when the war ended? RedneckH, you truly are one of that special group that can look a one-worlder anti-Nuke Lib pacifist in the eye and say,”Truman’s decision to drop the Bomb no doubt saved my dad’s life” – with conviction.An invassion of the home islands of Japan was going to cost a million US casualties. It would have been horrific for the first-in including your dad. Thank you for this excellent and straight to the point tribute for Memorial Day, and of course I found it on UP.

      • I always envision them, sailing with no lights through the dark ocean, and suddenly having the lights come back on. Yeah, I was thinking that thought you said, just yesterday.

        A similar story of my Mom’s Dad. He joined at the tail end of WWI, got caught in the influenza epidemic and was quarantined to barracks with the other victims. He wrote his mother that he was the only soldier in that barrack to survive the flu. Not all are killed by man, I often think about the reason a whole lot of his progeny are alive walking around today. Fortunes of war.

        As I always say, no matter what the outcome, all who serve are noble, and those who pay their all are honored most of all.

        Thanks, LIO for providing your tribute, your Dad sounds like a good man & I wish both you and him well.

  2. I lost my Dad the week GWB and Don Rumsfeld began ‘Shock & Awe’ on Saddam. Dad had served as a 2Lt co-pilot on a B-17 with the 8th AF out of England. He flew some missions over Germany, raining down death & destruction, until he was shot down, losing some crewmen, but survived and rode out the rest of the conflict in a stalag, a POW camp. He seldom spoke of those experiences, except for a cute story on how we pronounce our surname (NOT how the Nazi interrogators pronounced it) and his dislike for cabbage & rutabagas, which is largely what both he and his captors had to eat, especially as victory drew near. He also disliked the TV show Hogan’s Heroes, found no humor in it whatsoever. My sibs and I miss him greatly.

  3. LIO, my dad was in the AF and served in New Guinea. It’s possible our dads shared a fox hole together because the Japanese regularly bombed the heck out the American positions.

    My dad had a picture of himself with his 3 best friends in New Guinea. He never talked about the war but he did tell me that all three were killed, two of them in non-combat accidents.

    I still remember him looking at that picture and saying “it” was the biggest waste in the world. Dad continued to serve in the Guard for many years after the war. We lost him in ’77 to a car wreck.

    God bless your dad and all the brave souls who have served and a big high five to those serving today.

  4. Many came back with scars you can’t see, as they do from today’s combat zones. Still, those men did indeed save the world, and all owe them gratitude.

    I know you treasure these remaining days with your father, LIO. As you know, I just lost my father-in-law, another one of that generation gone, the likes of which I’m not sure we’ll ever see again.

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