Friday, September 17, 2021
HomeBy An Angel's KissThe Cello Sings Harmony, SGT Sean T Callahan and Lance Cpl Dominic...

The Cello Sings Harmony, SGT Sean T Callahan and Lance Cpl Dominic J Ciaramitaro, USMC

Kissed by an Angel, Where Violins are the Angels Voices,

and the Cello Sings Harmony.

For they swore by the Holy Water,
They swore by the salt they ate,
That the soul of Lieutenant Eshmitt Sahib
Should go to his God in state;
With fifty file of Burman
To open him Heaven’s gate.

(Kipling)

Stand down, Marines

Semper Fidelis

SGT Sean T Callan, 23 of Warrenton, VA and

and Lance Cpl Dominic J Ciaramitaro, 19, of South Lyon, MI

died Apr 23 while conducting combat operations in Hellmand Province, Aghanistan

They were of the 3rd Bn, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force

Rest in Peace


 

Lord, we ask your blessing today as we gather to pay our respects to another American serviceman/woman/hero. It is our duty and our honor to gather together to honor this fellow American. Give strength to his/her family in their time of grief. Keep watch over our troops deployed through out the world and also here at home, as well as their families. The price of freedom is a cost borne by few for the benefit of many. Too often, we take for granted the freedoms that we enjoy, and it is at times like this that we realize that freedom is never free. We would also ask your blessing on us as we travel back to our homes, and we thank you, Lord for this day. Amen.

To see where Hellmand Province is, and what the casualty rate is, visit and support iCasualties.org,

10 COMMENTS

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10 COMMENTS

  1. I didn’t know Dominic personally, but we are relatives; I heard about his death from my aunt, who was his grandmother.

    Do you realize that that Kipling poem is about what we would now call a war atrocity? An English officer was shot during a battle, and his troops decided to kill fifty (later increased to one hundred) enemy soldiers who were in retreat, and then mutilate their corpses. I don’t know his views on the Afghanistan War, but as a Marine and an American, Dominic wouldn’t have condoned that.

    • Thanks for the head’s up. My apologies for any offense, as none was intended. I got that poem from a veteran with multiple tours in the Middle east, who knows Kipling poetry very well.

      His response to me, “… the Kipling poem is about an atrocity but many who know first hand have called War itself an atrocity. I agree. The poem, as it is shown, speaks about the bond formed between an English Lieutenant and his Indian troops. A bond strong enough that foreign men risked their lives to hunt down and exact vengeance for the death of their feringhi Leader. It’s that part of a poem by a respected author who was there at the time, that we try to honor men who have fallen in the same places 140 years later. It is that brotherhood of arms that will be required if we are ever to be successful in Afghanistan. I’m sorry anyone is offended, but hope by shedding a little light on our motivations it has helped you to see it from the soldier’s point of view.”

      I’m asking around for a better substitute. Maybe you could suggest one.

        • john, I don’t want to argue, this isn’t the place for it, but I do have reply to your comment.

          Soldiers don’t get to choose why or where or when we fight wars. Never have. Clausewitz said “War is not merely a political act, but also a political instrument, a continuation of political relations, a carrying out of the same by other means.” In the 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment we used to say “We execute the last 300 meters of National Policy.”

          It’s been written about multitudes of times and my own experience, in both Iraq and Afghanistan has proven beyond a shadow of a doubt to me, American Soldiers fight for their buddies, the man on their left and right. When the stench of burned powder is a pall over your position and you hear the snap of small arms past your ear, there is no flag, no Constitution, no Nation, only your friends beside you. Someone a damn sight better than Clausewitz had something to say about men of that caliber.

          Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
          John 15:13

  2. My deepest gratitude to these two young men who gave the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation. May God keep them in His care, and may He hold the families and loved ones close and give them peace and comfort in their loss.

  1. I didn’t know Dominic personally, but we are relatives; I heard about his death from my aunt, who was his grandmother.

    Do you realize that that Kipling poem is about what we would now call a war atrocity? An English officer was shot during a battle, and his troops decided to kill fifty (later increased to one hundred) enemy soldiers who were in retreat, and then mutilate their corpses. I don’t know his views on the Afghanistan War, but as a Marine and an American, Dominic wouldn’t have condoned that.

    • Thanks for the head’s up. My apologies for any offense, as none was intended. I got that poem from a veteran with multiple tours in the Middle east, who knows Kipling poetry very well.

      His response to me, “… the Kipling poem is about an atrocity but many who know first hand have called War itself an atrocity. I agree. The poem, as it is shown, speaks about the bond formed between an English Lieutenant and his Indian troops. A bond strong enough that foreign men risked their lives to hunt down and exact vengeance for the death of their feringhi Leader. It’s that part of a poem by a respected author who was there at the time, that we try to honor men who have fallen in the same places 140 years later. It is that brotherhood of arms that will be required if we are ever to be successful in Afghanistan. I’m sorry anyone is offended, but hope by shedding a little light on our motivations it has helped you to see it from the soldier’s point of view.”

      I’m asking around for a better substitute. Maybe you could suggest one.

        • john, I don’t want to argue, this isn’t the place for it, but I do have reply to your comment.

          Soldiers don’t get to choose why or where or when we fight wars. Never have. Clausewitz said “War is not merely a political act, but also a political instrument, a continuation of political relations, a carrying out of the same by other means.” In the 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment we used to say “We execute the last 300 meters of National Policy.”

          It’s been written about multitudes of times and my own experience, in both Iraq and Afghanistan has proven beyond a shadow of a doubt to me, American Soldiers fight for their buddies, the man on their left and right. When the stench of burned powder is a pall over your position and you hear the snap of small arms past your ear, there is no flag, no Constitution, no Nation, only your friends beside you. Someone a damn sight better than Clausewitz had something to say about men of that caliber.

          Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
          John 15:13

  2. My deepest gratitude to these two young men who gave the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation. May God keep them in His care, and may He hold the families and loved ones close and give them peace and comfort in their loss.

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