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HomeFeatured EntriesThe Ivory Coast Civil War: Can the U.S. Skip This One?

The Ivory Coast Civil War: Can the U.S. Skip This One?

Yet another dictator, this time in Africa’s Ivory Coast is at war with his own people. Laurent Gbagbo lost in a recent election to Alassane Ouattara. Gbagbo has refused to recognize the election results, even though the international community says the election was legitimate. Ouattara’s supporters are in violent revolt against Gbagbo.

The French military says UN and French peacekeepers have seized the airport in the capitol city of Abidjan. Fighting continues in the capitol, with Outtara forces apparently gaining the edge.

Earlier today, a thousand bodies were found in the city of Duekoue after it had fallen to forces of Alassane Quattara. Some were hacked to death with machetes.

Where’s the U.S. on this civil war? From “The Australian” newspaper:

With reports emerging across the country of summary executions, massacres, rapes and serious human rights abuses, Hillary Clinton, the US Secretary of State, said that America was “deeply concerned” about the situation in the West African country, once one of the most prosperous on the continent.

There seems to be no threat to U.S. national interests from this dust-up in the Ivory Coast. The French are on the ground there. Despite the new Obama interest in intervening for humanitarian reasons (Libya), would it be too much to ask for the U.S. to just stay out of this one? U.S. resources are already stretched to the max.

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texasgalt
Texas native. Conservative small businessman with 31 years experience. Government should roll back the nanny state. No country can tax its way to prosperity. The question isn't who will let me but who will stop me?

19 COMMENTS

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19 COMMENTS

  1. They’ve killed enough people to really get Samantha Powers’ attention and this isn’t the first time they’ve gotten frisky, either.

    Since Samantha is the bleeding heart national security council expert behind Obama (and ea good guess to be Sec of State in the second Obama administration) she probably can’t resist this one. She is after all, the one who developed the ‘responsibility to protect’ doctrine and has been looking for a place to apply it.

    Watch for a trial balloon from the administration in the next 72 hours or so… maybe a transfer from Libya to IC?

    If Obama goes into IC, then he’s started as many wars as he inherited. That’s probably going to give them pause.

    • I don’t think he will jump in on this in any meaningful way. Not militarily at least. The French and the U.N. own this mess
      My report from last night suggested that forces loyal to Gbagbo were committing atrocities but from what I am reading this morning it seems Quattara’s forces may be behind that big slaughter.

      There is no oil and no good guys here.
      Nothing Obama needs.

      • It is a tragedy, but if the African Union won’t or can’t stop it, does it fall on the U.S.? I think we have a responsibility to try to stay ahead of these humanitarian disasters but our fine military is too thin to take on another police action, war or whatever you call these things.

  2. In Africa the former colonial powers (France, England, Italy, Portugal and Spain) all have veto over US involvement. France is the most selfish. They killed a bunch of people in Chad a few years back and it barely made the news. Sudan plays by special rules as it never really was anyone’s (Anglo’s only north of the line) and oil trumps all others (Libya).

  3. The information about Ivory Coast on the net is either Marxist in orientation or incomplete. The north of the country, where Outtara gains his support, is Muslim. The south, where Gbagbo gets his support, is Christian. So there is a religious conflict here and given what has gone on in Sudan and other countries split similarly I do not trust the narrative we have gotten from the media. That said, by de-Marxizing the post-colonialist narrative in some African sources we may be able to tease out the truth.

    Ivory Coast Background

    Cote d’Ivoire: The Difficult Legacy of Houphouet Boigny

    Cote d’Ivoire Unrest 2011

    Until our Independence: An Ivory Coast blog in English

  4. As I have said elsewhere, if there is no AQ or Muslim Brotherhood involved, you know hardcore Islamists, there doesn’t appear to be a desire in this Administration. They only seem to help in setting up an Islamic continent not helping slaughtered human beings.

  5. I’ve a question and it’s going to seem quite snarky. However, I’m thoroughly serious.

    The Ivory Coast is the world’s largest supplier of cacao beans and cocoa, a.k.a. ‘chocolate’. The number is around 45% if I remember correctly.

    When/if any ‘kinetic action’ is taken, will the cry go out “no war for chocolate !” or if the nation is ignored and left to it’s own implosion, “We need to invade to save the world’s chocolate !” … ???

    Kenny Solomon
    Israel Survival Updates

  6. texasgalt, add another country to that list, and an ally at that…Yemen. It was announced on Saturday that US is calling for Yemeni leader Saleh to step down.

    So, I’m going to post the link for the article source, but it is the NYT, folks. Accuracy questionable. Bias guaranteed. What I did find interesting in this article is how people from other nations depend on the US to act as a “peace regulator” in the world community. And I’m not talking about “peace” as in “let’s all just get along” kumbaya kind of peace. I’m talking about the kind of peacekeeping mission where we say “Hey, you over there…leader of [insert name of nation here]…knock off the nonsense or we’ll be in your face.

    This is what people the world over have been accustomed to from the US. They expect us to lead in these kinds of situations, not straddle the fence.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/04/world/middleeast/04yemen.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    • You are right about what the American people expect.

      We are now in a situation where we will soon be bankrupt–a situation we have never before been in. This makes it difficult for me to take a side on all of these conflicts that are popping up all over the world.

      We are broke. And the CinC does not know how to lead, nor have any interest in leading.

      Unfortunately at this time, Obama’s way of facing evil is to read a teleprompter at it. When he needed to act, at the time Iran was ready to revolt, he blinked.

      His actions in Libya may be the straw that takes down his presidency. The last video I saw of him addressing the Ivory Coast, he looked sick and apathetic. I think he has realized that by his actions/non-actions in Libya he has cost himself re-election. This was only confirmed by the fact that his video re-election campaign announcement doesn’t include him.

      • I agree, redneck. The financial situation makes it that much difficult to prioritize. But it occurred to me after reading this article, and I hadn’t really looked at from this viewpoint before….if we don’t act as the peacekeepers, who takes our place? China? Russia?

        Our “house” is falling in around us. The best way to be of help to others in the long run is to get our own house in order first. But what kind of implications will it have around the globe if we do?

        We need leadership now in the worst sort of way, and Obama doesn’t have what it takes.

        • Yes, The number one job of the president is to lead on foreign policy and protect US interests. This job is currently worse than vacant. The jester has usurped the crown. All we can do is contribute in whatever way possible to the righting of the ship, by becoming active politically, in whatever form possible for us as individuals.

          Our so-called leader is only interested in manipulating his image in order to retain power. Ever since his first days in office it’s been obvious he is only doing PR. We have a lot of cleanup to do in order to grow our economy and enable us to be once more an arsenal for freedom when necessary.

    • Hi lineholder! Yes, thanks for pointing this out.

      I’ll say this. We wouldn’t have to do so dang much “leading” if we would really take care of business in a couple of these conflicts.

      I’m pretty sick of seeing America bleed out slowly. We are so worried about hurting feelings and too worried about collateral damage. 10 freaking years in A-stan.

      You can’t tame these places unless you are willing to break the will of the bad guys. Half measures are getting our boys and girls killed. Digging water well is killing our people.

      I say stay the heck out of these dust-ups unless we are willing to kill a lot of people . . . but tell them first: We’re coming. This is the reason we are coming. Now, make a choice cause when we saddle-up, we won’t be taking time to pick and choose targets.

      Then, when the inevitable happens, have the guts to say: Sorry, it’s a gunfight. S- – t happens. Kill teams happen.

      I’m not joking. If we don’t have the guts to do what really needs to be done, then get my namesake nephew and all our people out of the kill zones.

      • I know, texasgalt. The noncommittal ambivalent attitude that’s been displayed of late rubs me the wrong way too.

        Whether we like it or not, whether we even want it to be this way or not, part of the US role in this world we live in has to been to act as a deterrent force to unscrupulous entities in other countries whose lust for power and control is as irrational as it gets.

        The “kumbaya” plan of attack just doesn’t get it done.

  7. Barack Obama set a deadline…a deadline….of December 31, 2009 for Iran to accept the terms of the UN-crafted deal concerning it’s nuclear program. Today is April 4, 2011.
    No one in the media even brings it up any more.

  8. Another thing that, if you missed it it’s not your fault because it hasn’t happened, is a hearing on the subject by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Chaired since January 3 by a Republican from your area Ileana Ros-Lehtinen ( who I have admired in the past). Look, I know individual critters, especially Chairmen, may be busy, but they have staffs. There is a subcommitte hearing for April 6 in which one of the topics is proliferation, but I will be highly surprised if a senior administration official is hauled in there to answer what happened to that Dec. 31, 2009 deadline.

  1. They’ve killed enough people to really get Samantha Powers’ attention and this isn’t the first time they’ve gotten frisky, either.

    Since Samantha is the bleeding heart national security council expert behind Obama (and ea good guess to be Sec of State in the second Obama administration) she probably can’t resist this one. She is after all, the one who developed the ‘responsibility to protect’ doctrine and has been looking for a place to apply it.

    Watch for a trial balloon from the administration in the next 72 hours or so… maybe a transfer from Libya to IC?

    If Obama goes into IC, then he’s started as many wars as he inherited. That’s probably going to give them pause.

    • I don’t think he will jump in on this in any meaningful way. Not militarily at least. The French and the U.N. own this mess
      My report from last night suggested that forces loyal to Gbagbo were committing atrocities but from what I am reading this morning it seems Quattara’s forces may be behind that big slaughter.

      There is no oil and no good guys here.
      Nothing Obama needs.

      • It is a tragedy, but if the African Union won’t or can’t stop it, does it fall on the U.S.? I think we have a responsibility to try to stay ahead of these humanitarian disasters but our fine military is too thin to take on another police action, war or whatever you call these things.

  2. In Africa the former colonial powers (France, England, Italy, Portugal and Spain) all have veto over US involvement. France is the most selfish. They killed a bunch of people in Chad a few years back and it barely made the news. Sudan plays by special rules as it never really was anyone’s (Anglo’s only north of the line) and oil trumps all others (Libya).

  3. The information about Ivory Coast on the net is either Marxist in orientation or incomplete. The north of the country, where Outtara gains his support, is Muslim. The south, where Gbagbo gets his support, is Christian. So there is a religious conflict here and given what has gone on in Sudan and other countries split similarly I do not trust the narrative we have gotten from the media. That said, by de-Marxizing the post-colonialist narrative in some African sources we may be able to tease out the truth.

    Ivory Coast Background

    Cote d’Ivoire: The Difficult Legacy of Houphouet Boigny

    Cote d’Ivoire Unrest 2011

    Until our Independence: An Ivory Coast blog in English

  4. As I have said elsewhere, if there is no AQ or Muslim Brotherhood involved, you know hardcore Islamists, there doesn’t appear to be a desire in this Administration. They only seem to help in setting up an Islamic continent not helping slaughtered human beings.

  5. I’ve a question and it’s going to seem quite snarky. However, I’m thoroughly serious.

    The Ivory Coast is the world’s largest supplier of cacao beans and cocoa, a.k.a. ‘chocolate’. The number is around 45% if I remember correctly.

    When/if any ‘kinetic action’ is taken, will the cry go out “no war for chocolate !” or if the nation is ignored and left to it’s own implosion, “We need to invade to save the world’s chocolate !” … ???

    Kenny Solomon
    Israel Survival Updates

  6. texasgalt, add another country to that list, and an ally at that…Yemen. It was announced on Saturday that US is calling for Yemeni leader Saleh to step down.

    So, I’m going to post the link for the article source, but it is the NYT, folks. Accuracy questionable. Bias guaranteed. What I did find interesting in this article is how people from other nations depend on the US to act as a “peace regulator” in the world community. And I’m not talking about “peace” as in “let’s all just get along” kumbaya kind of peace. I’m talking about the kind of peacekeeping mission where we say “Hey, you over there…leader of [insert name of nation here]…knock off the nonsense or we’ll be in your face.

    This is what people the world over have been accustomed to from the US. They expect us to lead in these kinds of situations, not straddle the fence.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/04/world/middleeast/04yemen.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    • You are right about what the American people expect.

      We are now in a situation where we will soon be bankrupt–a situation we have never before been in. This makes it difficult for me to take a side on all of these conflicts that are popping up all over the world.

      We are broke. And the CinC does not know how to lead, nor have any interest in leading.

      Unfortunately at this time, Obama’s way of facing evil is to read a teleprompter at it. When he needed to act, at the time Iran was ready to revolt, he blinked.

      His actions in Libya may be the straw that takes down his presidency. The last video I saw of him addressing the Ivory Coast, he looked sick and apathetic. I think he has realized that by his actions/non-actions in Libya he has cost himself re-election. This was only confirmed by the fact that his video re-election campaign announcement doesn’t include him.

      • I agree, redneck. The financial situation makes it that much difficult to prioritize. But it occurred to me after reading this article, and I hadn’t really looked at from this viewpoint before….if we don’t act as the peacekeepers, who takes our place? China? Russia?

        Our “house” is falling in around us. The best way to be of help to others in the long run is to get our own house in order first. But what kind of implications will it have around the globe if we do?

        We need leadership now in the worst sort of way, and Obama doesn’t have what it takes.

        • Yes, The number one job of the president is to lead on foreign policy and protect US interests. This job is currently worse than vacant. The jester has usurped the crown. All we can do is contribute in whatever way possible to the righting of the ship, by becoming active politically, in whatever form possible for us as individuals.

          Our so-called leader is only interested in manipulating his image in order to retain power. Ever since his first days in office it’s been obvious he is only doing PR. We have a lot of cleanup to do in order to grow our economy and enable us to be once more an arsenal for freedom when necessary.

    • Hi lineholder! Yes, thanks for pointing this out.

      I’ll say this. We wouldn’t have to do so dang much “leading” if we would really take care of business in a couple of these conflicts.

      I’m pretty sick of seeing America bleed out slowly. We are so worried about hurting feelings and too worried about collateral damage. 10 freaking years in A-stan.

      You can’t tame these places unless you are willing to break the will of the bad guys. Half measures are getting our boys and girls killed. Digging water well is killing our people.

      I say stay the heck out of these dust-ups unless we are willing to kill a lot of people . . . but tell them first: We’re coming. This is the reason we are coming. Now, make a choice cause when we saddle-up, we won’t be taking time to pick and choose targets.

      Then, when the inevitable happens, have the guts to say: Sorry, it’s a gunfight. S- – t happens. Kill teams happen.

      I’m not joking. If we don’t have the guts to do what really needs to be done, then get my namesake nephew and all our people out of the kill zones.

      • I know, texasgalt. The noncommittal ambivalent attitude that’s been displayed of late rubs me the wrong way too.

        Whether we like it or not, whether we even want it to be this way or not, part of the US role in this world we live in has to been to act as a deterrent force to unscrupulous entities in other countries whose lust for power and control is as irrational as it gets.

        The “kumbaya” plan of attack just doesn’t get it done.

  7. Barack Obama set a deadline…a deadline….of December 31, 2009 for Iran to accept the terms of the UN-crafted deal concerning it’s nuclear program. Today is April 4, 2011.
    No one in the media even brings it up any more.

  8. Another thing that, if you missed it it’s not your fault because it hasn’t happened, is a hearing on the subject by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Chaired since January 3 by a Republican from your area Ileana Ros-Lehtinen ( who I have admired in the past). Look, I know individual critters, especially Chairmen, may be busy, but they have staffs. There is a subcommitte hearing for April 6 in which one of the topics is proliferation, but I will be highly surprised if a senior administration official is hauled in there to answer what happened to that Dec. 31, 2009 deadline.

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