Sunday, September 26, 2021
HomeRecommendedIf Fascism and Communism Were Business Models, Which Would You Choose?

If Fascism and Communism Were Business Models, Which Would You Choose?

This is a serious question, for the answer to this question is easy. And for the most part, many Americans have made it.

I was at the “Y” today, looking at our parking lot, which was filled because of the soccer matches going on next door. I noticed all the really expensive SUV’s and sedans there. Not an old heap in the lot.

Now, I’m one of those people who can just sit and muse for hours about people going about their daily lives oblivious to the evil swirling around them every day. I’m always asking the questions, “Do they not know?  Do they not care?  Can’t they connect the dots?”

But, in truth, the answer is already there. It just really doesn’t affect them all that much.

17% unemployment, but you won’t see it around here. Oh, there are other sections of town where the evidence is abundant; abandoned store fronts, empty factory lots, office space unrented, unkempt properties. For Sale signs up and down every street. In fact, there were several SUV’s here last Spring, that no longer come here with their kids, possibly because their business failed, or they had to cut back on luxuries such as soccer, or they lost their job and had to move. All sorts of reasons, I suppose.

Fascism vs Communism

Fascism (the Nazis) and the Communists (the Soviets) have both been called totalitarian regimes. But I wonder if that is entirely true. How can you have tyranny when from 50% to 80% of the people accept it without question?

Compare. The Communism of Lenin,  Stalin and his successors was a true dictatorship of misery, where roughly 80% of the people of the country suffered equally and barbarously, deprived of everything but the most basic of human needs, while the other 20%, the Party and apparatchiks, lived lives of power and security.

I doubt, unless circumstances absolutely mandated it (hold onto this thought), anyone would intentionally create a system like that. In fact, historical conditions peculiar to Russia caused them to start their country like this, from the outset, whereas socialism always takes a society…to the same total degradation and misery. “The road to hell is paved…”

In other words, the Soviets created out of necessity in 1921 what socialism naturally creates it over time.

But first consider the Nazis, where these numbers were reversed. From 1935 through 1942-43, before we started bombing the crap out of them and the Russians killed or captured so many of them they stopped bringing them back for burial, the people of Germany lived pretty good lives, somewhat aware, as now, but indifferent, as now, to the misery of the incarceration and murder dished out to approximately 20% of their population.

Is it fair to say that Nazi Germany was “totalitarian” when so many of the people were not seriously affected by its horrid laws?  In fact, most Germans approved, at least to the extent they actually knew, or would allow themselves to know, about what was happening to the other 20%. (Denial is a still a great personal tool, huh?, especially if you want to keep the SUV.)

To be sure, the Nazis created inconveniences for their people, but most were of the kind you still find in Europe today; i.e, regulations. You have to have papers for everything. Massive bureaucracies. But their cars were big and shiny, the shops bustling, the parties grand, the music wunderbar. This was the bright life of the those who lived in the parts of town where the street lights hadn’t been shot out. The despair was out of sight.

Of these two business models, it’s a no-brainer, and post-war Europe chose early. All they had to remove were the more draconian rules instituted by the Nazis, and get rid of those godawful names, “fascism” and “Nazism.” “Socialist” has a much better ring, and even a better pedigree.

But they are the same.

In the late 20’s, before the rise of Hitler, the Bolsheviks referred to fascists as “middle class socialists.”  They had very specific reasons for calling them this, for the Communists knew “middle class people” have certain proclivities, and those proclivities would some day win out. To an old Soviet who knew his history he always knew this rise across Europe of “middle class socialism” was still fascism.

As they have proven since the 1950s, the people of Europe were ready, willing, even eager to swap a few “liberties” for a well-regulated society and cradle-to-grave health care. And select businesses were happy to become “allied” with the State. For one,  it ended competition. In fact, this socialism was so popular, the Euros ran out of people to mop the floors, cleanup after the dogs on the strasse, or pump the gas, so they had to import them…first from Turkey (in Germany) and Algeria and French Africa (France) in the 60’s, to Palestinians in the 80s-90s, to lately, Albanians.

So, even the straw men return eventually.

Analysis

There’s a lot of history behind why the Soviet model turned out how it did, and why the German model turned out how it did. Both had to work with cards they had been dealt. The old Russian Empire was of medieval design; a royal house, an appointed middle class purveying almost exclusively to the royals, and the rest of the country, 80% or so, in abject poverty and ignorance, living by the skin of their teeth, getting scraps from the royals’ tables by selling their grain to granaries owned by the royals.

The Germans on the other hand had a vibrant middle class; arts, academe, most every one was educated, but for the Gypsies; most everyone was clean and hygienic, but for the Gypsies, great beer, flugelhorns and blond frauleins. Who would voluntarily destroy that?

Most of all, every German had a pecking order of people they could look down their noses at, from the aforementioned Gypsies, to the Slavic people in general, to the Poles out of jealousy because they produced better piano players, and of course, Europe’s greatest straw men since the Dark Ages, the Jews, who, every time something went wrong in Europe, they’d round them up and kill a bunch. A big bunch. Entire villages and regions. Jews were blamed for the Plague, the Black Death, Germany’s humiliating defeat at the hands of the French! in World War I, the ensuing worldwide depression. In Scott’s fiction (Ivanhoe), they were even blamed for Prince John not being able to raise money to ransom King Richard, and bewitching a horny Frenchman.

It’s this racist hatred that separates the Nazis from modern socialism, and has allowed modern socialists to stand and point and say, “Hey, we didn’t do any of that.”

Because of the megalomania of Hitler and to a lesser degree, Mussolini, no one ever got to see how fascism would turn out in Germany or Italy. As economic models they were never tested. We did get a glimpse of it with Franco, who was able to continue his version of fascism until he died in 1975. But Spain was a poor country, and like Italy, a bit too Dionysian (viz Ruth Benedict, not Nietzsche) to be taken seriously as an economic model for anything. Spain simply gravitated into the European model of socialism, more or less as a junior partner.

Since the 1950s Europe has viewed itself as a kind, gentle and urbane socialism, certainly not totalitarian as the Soviets had been. And certainly not barbaric as the fascists had been. Marx with a smiley face.

(h/t Specialist)

After all, too many of their citizens approved of the systems and controls they had imposed. There were no concentration camps. Yes, there were lots of forms to fill out, but never the abusive demand to show papers just to get on a street car. The politzei, gendarmes, bangen are uniformly polite. Their crime rates are low, in part because their best defense against crime is to legalize it. Drugs, pornography, under-age anything. And they are 100% ineffectual in “those 20% parts” of the towns where the guest workers lived, so they just don’t go there. Sort of like Minnesota Street in Billings.

And best of all, they did it with funny accounting and no real money.

The problem has always been, the ranks of the voluntary participants rise as the taxpayers retreat, from 80%, to 60% and so on, until, Shazzam, all the producers who paid for the non-producers have either died, moved to Hong Kong, or simply quit. The Bolsheviks were right. The money runs out when all that is left is the government class, at which time…and we see this with unions now…they must turn on themselves.

What comes next, of course, is chaos, then communism/totalitarianism.

Lessons learned

1) Middle Class Socialists are fascists, they just don’t imprison and kill in the same way.

2) Communism comes at the end of the socialist cycle, not at the beginning as the Soviet falsely taught us.

3) When things go badly, straw men reemerge. And guess what, in Europe, they need to placate their domestic workers. So they let sharia law rule in “those parts” of town, the new trend seems to be. And since Hitler killed most of them, they can’t just roll out a bunch of Jews to mock and spit at. But there is still Israel. Policies change subtly, so once again the Jew is reviled in Europe.

The long and short of it is that we are seeing how “fascism” would likely have ended up had the Third Reich made it 50 years down the pike. It would have drowned in the same bureaucratic effluent muck that is swallowing Europe today. And with the re-emergence of the straw men, we know it is nearing the time when it is ready to return to barbarism, for as we saw in Greece and will see in Portugal, then across the continent, it will have to pluck its own.

OK, you can see, as the old Cheyenne once said, My Heart is Bad.

This is my annual tax season note, when I am never in a good humor. I send off my return saying I owe this, and they always send me a letter saying “No, you owe this” so then I have to go knock over a liquor store I know to be absentee owned by a crooked Russian in Brighton’s Beach. From one thief to another. It’s all very annoying, and dispiriting.

But for us in the Movement, from time to time we have to have a come-to-tyranny moment, and realize that the left, the fascist left, are still doing a land office business here in America. Even as they are going broke and filing for bankruptcy in Europe, they are having ten-cent sales and membership drives here…not because they believe all that pap about security and social justice, but because they see the brass ring at the end of the line…complete totalitarian control of the human mind, body and spirit.

Which brings us back to my parking lot at the YMCA and the original question in the title.

This is not the sort of thing people can carry in the front of their minds all the time. They’d burn out. But still, it’s worrisome to consider that they may not think about it at all. This is why we pause and reflect, even set aside days for it. This is why we say grace, or pray; to remember those less fortunate.

But none of this matters unless a few of us also pause to remind ourselves that something can be done, must be done, and sooner – not later.

We have all sorts of enemies out there, but this is our one demon… that the majority of the American people will choose fascism as long as 80% of them don’t have to watch the other 20% suffer.

We must make their choice more difficult.

 

 

 

vassarbushmills
Citizen With Bark On

24 COMMENTS

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24 COMMENTS

  1. Vassar, you have the most uncanny knack for expressing the most worrisome things in historical context. What you talk about here is what I have been thinking for the last two days. That so many folks are just going about their lives as if this country is not suffering through its death throes as a free and democratic republic. We are insolvent, we are being overwhelmed with government in all its excesses, and we are being lied to daily by both government and the media to lull us into believing that what is truth is not actually happening right under our noses.

    And people want to believe that, just because the stores and commercials are still featuring the latest gadget and gizmo, and they can still find some credit to buy them, that everything is just as it used to be 10 or 20 years ago. They do not WANT to see the yawning abyss that is right in front of us, preferring instead to believe that it only exists for the “others” and not for them.

    I fear that it will take a huge and horrible humbling before enough people are willing to see the truth. What form that will take, I cannot even begin to imagine. But if it happens, then it needs to strip the country down to the bedrock, to where absolute truths exist and lies are no longer a luxury we can afford.

    • Janis, I’m afraid I’ve had the same malaise, and couldn’t quite define what was bothering me.

      Yes, Vassar, you’ve described the symptoms and illness, but I am afraid that by the time the people find the cure – it will be too late.

      The despair was out of sight.

      Very true, and since it isn’t happening to them…

    • But if it happens, then it needs to strip the country down to the bedrock, to where absolute truths exist and lies are no longer a luxury we can afford.

      Amen. That sums it up in a nutshell. As long as the political class fears the least common denominator more than the loss of the republic, the slide will continue.

      Cormac McCarthy’s novel, The Road, illustrates an end time scenario based on nuclear disaster. However, your whole comment brought to mind the devastation that may be required before we can rise from the ashes.

      • I think, red, when I wrote this comment, I had Japan on my mind from seeing some scenes of the devastation there this morning. And a piece about how some folks from a town were loaded onto buses and taken to an elementary school to live for the next 6 months or so, until houses can be built for them once more.

        They were so grateful to have that amount of space once they got to the elementary school after the cramped quarters that they had been in. Deprivation had worked wonders for their perspective on things. Perhaps deprivation is also what many Americans need as well to put things once more into sharp focus.

    • Dang Janis, I said my heart was bad, So I wrote that to lighten my load and you come along and throw on some more logs.

      Actually, I think we can win this if given a chance. we’re not doing that badly. If God has a different plan, well, que sera, sera. We can only play the cards we’re dealt. I have no intention of trying to divine His.

  2. I know a passle of 30 sumpthin kids who had very good educations but don’t want real jobs and can’t keep the jobs they get. They bounce from one hostess/barkeeping job to another, making 4 – $500 a week with tips. They just want to have fun and in most cases mummy and daddy are standing by.

    None of these kids have any maturity about them and they are unfailing liberal. They’ve made their choices and can’t be saved- no amount of shame bothers them.

    • texasgalt- I just read somewhere in the last day or so an article that said that some very well educated college grads are looking forward to working at the DMV. They believe it is a secure job, and one that will provide for them for life. Ha, I guess they don’t plan on living very long. I wonder if Obama will require licenses for Rickshaws.

  3. Nicely done, Vassar. I did answer your question immediately, and had it confirmed by reading this marvelous retrospective forecast of tomorrow. And you are right, to keep these things in the forefront of our thoughts is counter-productive. The call is to action, first, last, and at all times.

    I recently read that in earlier times*, the meaning of tyranny was emphatically on its genesis. A tyrant was one who came to rule by a usurpation. Of lesser meaning was the later connotation that a tyrant was brutal and oppressive once in power. Now at issue is whether recognition of the situation is enough to spur reaction, and before that second meaning moves to the forefront and action is no longer possible.

    * a comment by Gibbon in The Decline and Fall

    It is sufficiently known that the odious appellation of Tyrant was often employed by the ancients to express the illegal seizure of supreme power, without any reference to the abuse of it.

    The reign of Valerian’s son only produced 19 pretenders. What a bunch of compromisers and moderates those Romans were. Couldn’t they at least have conjured up the full 30 like Athens?

    I love Gibbons, for his depth of detail and breadth of interpretation. So too, with our own resident scholars at UP, and you know who you are.

      • Some friends were discussing Montesquieue a couple of months ago. How would you / other UPers compare the two. I think M. also wrote on Rome? Will be a coon’s age before I finish Gibbon, so no rush to reply 🙂

        Not underlined, just fresh in memory in re “the 30 tyrants” so I flipped pages and found it. Can’t bring myself to mark up hardcover books. Maybe I ought to rethink that or get some post-it notes.

        • You can find cheap copies of Gibbon from the 60s, I always keep two copies of CS Lewis, one I can mark up, the other I can show on a bookcase to impress people. Montesquieu was probably more important, but on Rome I’ll defer to Gibbon. Never really studied him closely, but it must be fun to sit around and compare notes like that, coffee haus style. I envy you. As a rule the French only offer the world one decent person a century, but with Voltaire (I don’t like Rousseau) they used up their quota in the 1700s.

          • Maybe it makes me a snob but I like to show the dogeared, marked, stained and fingerprinted ones. Books is fer readin’! My current, but rotating favorite is always displayed on the toilet tank, for when I get long periods of uninterrupted time. There’s a beautiful set of Kipling on the top of both displays, by the way. He’s damn hard to beat but maybe I need to suffer through some Gibbons. That damn Clausewitz nearly ruined me. I’d give up coffee and drink nothing but sawdust before I’d read him again.

        • This reply is for nessa. When I mentioned scholars above, I was thinking of you, among a bunch of others. You have every right to display your “dogeared, marked, stained and fingerprinted ones.” My paperback books are falling apart, and I write in the margins in pencil.

          Paperbacks are also good for sharing with friends. I’ve learned not to share the hardcovers cause it costs too much to replace them. Never thought of my toilet tank as a display area. You are so making me laugh with that one! It is a man thing to read in the bathroom.

          Correct me if I’m wrong, ladies, but scientific studies proove that it is men who are addicted to reading in the john 🙂

  4. This, too, is what I’ve been seeing, Vassar. TG above also summed it up pretty well. The younger folks just want to party and have a good time while the walls cave in around them. Complacency is rampant. This is, unfortunately, why more and more come to conservatism at a later age, but this time it may be too late if action is not taken now. Many in Europe have started taking notice that socialism is unsustainable, but too many still think the gravy train hasn’t come to the end of the line, as the Greek riots have shown. They don’t think the 20% number of folks in despair can grow larger and suck them into that abyss.

    It can.

  5. I have one daughter who unfortunately, turned out to be a progressive. Between she and her fiance they make well over $100K a year and both drive late model cars. She is the HR manager for a local bank, he works for the railroad. It’s fairly unlikely that either of them will lose their jobs.

    I have tried to educate her on what is happening in this country but she just doesn’t get it. Probably as you say, Vassar, she never sees what’s really going on.

  6. There is a quotation running through my head that goes “We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to inflict violence on those who would do us harm.” I had always placed the US military among the category of those standing ready in the night, which is why it both pains and infuriates me to see the country’s best being ‘de-roughened’. That our soldiers are undergoing sensitivity training on the battlefield in Afghanistan is an abomination, as is that female soldiers over there are being ‘encouraged’ to wear headscarves.
    The things Vassar talks about, about people paying attention, about acting on principle, about, to quote Her Janetness, ‘seeing something, saying something’ are things that we are going to have to demand of the public servants we elect. They are going to have to ‘roughen up’.

    • Bob- I saw that article, with pictures of our female military members attired in headscarves. It was sickening. Just a short while ago I saw Petraeus admonishing the Koran burning pastor for his insensitivity, and blaming him for putting our troops at risk because of his irresponsibility. So, the SC just ruled that it is OK for the Westboro Baptist evil people to protest at our military members funerals, but the supreme commander of the Afghanistan war makes a very loud statement, on national TV, against another American for exercizing his first amendment speech rights. The radical Islamists don’t need an excuse or any reason to kill our troops, or all Americans if they had the chance. Maybe Petraeus needs to take another look at the US Rules of Engagement if his primary concern is the protection of our troops.

      I didn’t see anyone being killed when an art display of Jesus went up with our Lord being peeded on and covered with ants. How about the “art” that portrayed Jesus in a disgusting display with gay intonations?

      I’m getting more than a little worried when I see Petraeus shown in pictures yukking it up with Obama, when it was the Liberals that paid for a full page spread of him portrayed as General Betrayus in the NYT, on the day he was to testify before Congress on the Iraq War. That’s when Clinton brought out her “willing suspension of disbelief” comments which all but called him a liar. Isn’t every military member, from the top to the bottom ranks, sworn to uphold the Constitution of the US first and foremost? If the Pres. orders them to do something unconstitutional, who do they obey first? The Constitution or the Commander in Chief? I really would like to know that.

      • Here is the oath that every military member takes when being inducted into our armed forces.

        “I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

        I am focusing on the part “I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic: that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.”

        Does the Constitution override the Commander in Chief, if the CIC is the domestic enemy of the US?

      • When is someone in this administration, or anyone for that matter, going to call for the condemnation of the Mexican drug cartels who are beheading American citizens, our ICE agents or our border control agents? When will the United Nations take a firm stand against the radical Islamists for beheading some UN members? Time to take the velvet, blood stained gloves off, and condemn those that murder with no reason or excuse, other then that all Americans are the great Satan, just an inch behind Israel.

      • One of the most amazing arguments used by progressives is their claim that only the powerful would want the government to be less powerful. In their mythology, the government stands up for the have-nots against their rapacious peers. In fact, the truly rapacious entity is the government when entangled with businesses, creating what have always been known as monopolies until progressives renamed big companies as “monopolies” and real monopolies as “public private partnerships.”

        It is the powerful who want the government to have more power, not less, because a powerful government concentrates all the money and power in one place and makes it easier to steal the treasury. Without such a concentration of money and power the people would be much more secure in their property and selves than they are now.

  1. Vassar, you have the most uncanny knack for expressing the most worrisome things in historical context. What you talk about here is what I have been thinking for the last two days. That so many folks are just going about their lives as if this country is not suffering through its death throes as a free and democratic republic. We are insolvent, we are being overwhelmed with government in all its excesses, and we are being lied to daily by both government and the media to lull us into believing that what is truth is not actually happening right under our noses.

    And people want to believe that, just because the stores and commercials are still featuring the latest gadget and gizmo, and they can still find some credit to buy them, that everything is just as it used to be 10 or 20 years ago. They do not WANT to see the yawning abyss that is right in front of us, preferring instead to believe that it only exists for the “others” and not for them.

    I fear that it will take a huge and horrible humbling before enough people are willing to see the truth. What form that will take, I cannot even begin to imagine. But if it happens, then it needs to strip the country down to the bedrock, to where absolute truths exist and lies are no longer a luxury we can afford.

    • Janis, I’m afraid I’ve had the same malaise, and couldn’t quite define what was bothering me.

      Yes, Vassar, you’ve described the symptoms and illness, but I am afraid that by the time the people find the cure – it will be too late.

      The despair was out of sight.

      Very true, and since it isn’t happening to them…

    • But if it happens, then it needs to strip the country down to the bedrock, to where absolute truths exist and lies are no longer a luxury we can afford.

      Amen. That sums it up in a nutshell. As long as the political class fears the least common denominator more than the loss of the republic, the slide will continue.

      Cormac McCarthy’s novel, The Road, illustrates an end time scenario based on nuclear disaster. However, your whole comment brought to mind the devastation that may be required before we can rise from the ashes.

      • I think, red, when I wrote this comment, I had Japan on my mind from seeing some scenes of the devastation there this morning. And a piece about how some folks from a town were loaded onto buses and taken to an elementary school to live for the next 6 months or so, until houses can be built for them once more.

        They were so grateful to have that amount of space once they got to the elementary school after the cramped quarters that they had been in. Deprivation had worked wonders for their perspective on things. Perhaps deprivation is also what many Americans need as well to put things once more into sharp focus.

    • Dang Janis, I said my heart was bad, So I wrote that to lighten my load and you come along and throw on some more logs.

      Actually, I think we can win this if given a chance. we’re not doing that badly. If God has a different plan, well, que sera, sera. We can only play the cards we’re dealt. I have no intention of trying to divine His.

  2. I know a passle of 30 sumpthin kids who had very good educations but don’t want real jobs and can’t keep the jobs they get. They bounce from one hostess/barkeeping job to another, making 4 – $500 a week with tips. They just want to have fun and in most cases mummy and daddy are standing by.

    None of these kids have any maturity about them and they are unfailing liberal. They’ve made their choices and can’t be saved- no amount of shame bothers them.

    • texasgalt- I just read somewhere in the last day or so an article that said that some very well educated college grads are looking forward to working at the DMV. They believe it is a secure job, and one that will provide for them for life. Ha, I guess they don’t plan on living very long. I wonder if Obama will require licenses for Rickshaws.

  3. Nicely done, Vassar. I did answer your question immediately, and had it confirmed by reading this marvelous retrospective forecast of tomorrow. And you are right, to keep these things in the forefront of our thoughts is counter-productive. The call is to action, first, last, and at all times.

    I recently read that in earlier times*, the meaning of tyranny was emphatically on its genesis. A tyrant was one who came to rule by a usurpation. Of lesser meaning was the later connotation that a tyrant was brutal and oppressive once in power. Now at issue is whether recognition of the situation is enough to spur reaction, and before that second meaning moves to the forefront and action is no longer possible.

    * a comment by Gibbon in The Decline and Fall

    It is sufficiently known that the odious appellation of Tyrant was often employed by the ancients to express the illegal seizure of supreme power, without any reference to the abuse of it.

    The reign of Valerian’s son only produced 19 pretenders. What a bunch of compromisers and moderates those Romans were. Couldn’t they at least have conjured up the full 30 like Athens?

    I love Gibbons, for his depth of detail and breadth of interpretation. So too, with our own resident scholars at UP, and you know who you are.

      • Some friends were discussing Montesquieue a couple of months ago. How would you / other UPers compare the two. I think M. also wrote on Rome? Will be a coon’s age before I finish Gibbon, so no rush to reply 🙂

        Not underlined, just fresh in memory in re “the 30 tyrants” so I flipped pages and found it. Can’t bring myself to mark up hardcover books. Maybe I ought to rethink that or get some post-it notes.

        • You can find cheap copies of Gibbon from the 60s, I always keep two copies of CS Lewis, one I can mark up, the other I can show on a bookcase to impress people. Montesquieu was probably more important, but on Rome I’ll defer to Gibbon. Never really studied him closely, but it must be fun to sit around and compare notes like that, coffee haus style. I envy you. As a rule the French only offer the world one decent person a century, but with Voltaire (I don’t like Rousseau) they used up their quota in the 1700s.

          • Maybe it makes me a snob but I like to show the dogeared, marked, stained and fingerprinted ones. Books is fer readin’! My current, but rotating favorite is always displayed on the toilet tank, for when I get long periods of uninterrupted time. There’s a beautiful set of Kipling on the top of both displays, by the way. He’s damn hard to beat but maybe I need to suffer through some Gibbons. That damn Clausewitz nearly ruined me. I’d give up coffee and drink nothing but sawdust before I’d read him again.

        • This reply is for nessa. When I mentioned scholars above, I was thinking of you, among a bunch of others. You have every right to display your “dogeared, marked, stained and fingerprinted ones.” My paperback books are falling apart, and I write in the margins in pencil.

          Paperbacks are also good for sharing with friends. I’ve learned not to share the hardcovers cause it costs too much to replace them. Never thought of my toilet tank as a display area. You are so making me laugh with that one! It is a man thing to read in the bathroom.

          Correct me if I’m wrong, ladies, but scientific studies proove that it is men who are addicted to reading in the john 🙂

  4. This, too, is what I’ve been seeing, Vassar. TG above also summed it up pretty well. The younger folks just want to party and have a good time while the walls cave in around them. Complacency is rampant. This is, unfortunately, why more and more come to conservatism at a later age, but this time it may be too late if action is not taken now. Many in Europe have started taking notice that socialism is unsustainable, but too many still think the gravy train hasn’t come to the end of the line, as the Greek riots have shown. They don’t think the 20% number of folks in despair can grow larger and suck them into that abyss.

    It can.

  5. I have one daughter who unfortunately, turned out to be a progressive. Between she and her fiance they make well over $100K a year and both drive late model cars. She is the HR manager for a local bank, he works for the railroad. It’s fairly unlikely that either of them will lose their jobs.

    I have tried to educate her on what is happening in this country but she just doesn’t get it. Probably as you say, Vassar, she never sees what’s really going on.

  6. There is a quotation running through my head that goes “We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to inflict violence on those who would do us harm.” I had always placed the US military among the category of those standing ready in the night, which is why it both pains and infuriates me to see the country’s best being ‘de-roughened’. That our soldiers are undergoing sensitivity training on the battlefield in Afghanistan is an abomination, as is that female soldiers over there are being ‘encouraged’ to wear headscarves.
    The things Vassar talks about, about people paying attention, about acting on principle, about, to quote Her Janetness, ‘seeing something, saying something’ are things that we are going to have to demand of the public servants we elect. They are going to have to ‘roughen up’.

    • Bob- I saw that article, with pictures of our female military members attired in headscarves. It was sickening. Just a short while ago I saw Petraeus admonishing the Koran burning pastor for his insensitivity, and blaming him for putting our troops at risk because of his irresponsibility. So, the SC just ruled that it is OK for the Westboro Baptist evil people to protest at our military members funerals, but the supreme commander of the Afghanistan war makes a very loud statement, on national TV, against another American for exercizing his first amendment speech rights. The radical Islamists don’t need an excuse or any reason to kill our troops, or all Americans if they had the chance. Maybe Petraeus needs to take another look at the US Rules of Engagement if his primary concern is the protection of our troops.

      I didn’t see anyone being killed when an art display of Jesus went up with our Lord being peeded on and covered with ants. How about the “art” that portrayed Jesus in a disgusting display with gay intonations?

      I’m getting more than a little worried when I see Petraeus shown in pictures yukking it up with Obama, when it was the Liberals that paid for a full page spread of him portrayed as General Betrayus in the NYT, on the day he was to testify before Congress on the Iraq War. That’s when Clinton brought out her “willing suspension of disbelief” comments which all but called him a liar. Isn’t every military member, from the top to the bottom ranks, sworn to uphold the Constitution of the US first and foremost? If the Pres. orders them to do something unconstitutional, who do they obey first? The Constitution or the Commander in Chief? I really would like to know that.

      • Here is the oath that every military member takes when being inducted into our armed forces.

        “I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

        I am focusing on the part “I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic: that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.”

        Does the Constitution override the Commander in Chief, if the CIC is the domestic enemy of the US?

      • When is someone in this administration, or anyone for that matter, going to call for the condemnation of the Mexican drug cartels who are beheading American citizens, our ICE agents or our border control agents? When will the United Nations take a firm stand against the radical Islamists for beheading some UN members? Time to take the velvet, blood stained gloves off, and condemn those that murder with no reason or excuse, other then that all Americans are the great Satan, just an inch behind Israel.

      • One of the most amazing arguments used by progressives is their claim that only the powerful would want the government to be less powerful. In their mythology, the government stands up for the have-nots against their rapacious peers. In fact, the truly rapacious entity is the government when entangled with businesses, creating what have always been known as monopolies until progressives renamed big companies as “monopolies” and real monopolies as “public private partnerships.”

        It is the powerful who want the government to have more power, not less, because a powerful government concentrates all the money and power in one place and makes it easier to steal the treasury. Without such a concentration of money and power the people would be much more secure in their property and selves than they are now.

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