Friday, September 17, 2021
HomeRecommendedAbolish tenure for teachers - and US House chairmanships too

Abolish tenure for teachers – and US House chairmanships too


To paraphrase TEP principle Zeke Vanderhoek “The idea that a US House member could have a job for life no matter how they perform is not good for people in that job, much less for the constituents who have to suffer if that individual has gone downhill.” This idea of using tenure instead of merit needs to be abolished, period. I like to visit OpenCongress to gather information about votes that have taken place. Today I am using it to create a table that will help determine who should be assigned to the various US House committees based on merit rather than tenure. In the US House there have been over 200 votes taken, but in the US Senate only 34 votes. The data needs to include more votes in the US Senate before I can analyze the votes there.

Current US House Republicans Committee Chairs

Rank Name Total Votes Votes With Party Rate Committee Chair
11 Rep. Doc Hastings [R, WA-4] 202 196 97.0% Natural Resources
41 Rep. Darrell Issa [R, CA-49] 202 193 95.5% Oversight and Government Reform
52 Rep. John Kline [R, MN-2] 203 193 95.1% Education and Workforce
56 Rep. Lamar Smith [R, TX-21] 200 190 95.0% Judiciary
61 Rep. Samuel Graves [R, MO-6] 195 185 94.9% Small Business
63 Rep. Howard McKeon [R, CA-25] 203 192 94.6% Armed Services
78 Rep. Spencer Bachus [R, AL-6] 198 187 94.4% Financial Services
83 Rep. Michael Rogers [R, MI-8] 203 191 94.1% Intelligence
116 Rep. Jeff Miller [R, FL-1] 203 189 93.1% Veterans’ Affairs
117 Rep. David Dreier [R, CA-26] 203 189 93.1% Rules
127 Rep. John Mica [R, FL-7] 201 187 93.0% Transportation and Infrastructure
137 Rep. Jo Bonner [R, AL-1] 201 186 92.5% Ethics
143 Rep. Daniel Lungren [R, CA-3] 203 187 92.1% House Administration
144 Rep. Frank Lucas [R, OK-3] 203 187 92.1% Agriculture
148 Rep. Ralph Hall [R, TX-4] 198 182 91.9% Science Space & Technology
159 Rep. Harold Rogers [R, KY-5] 201 184 91.5% Appropriations
169 Rep. David Camp [R, MI-4] 202 184 91.1% Ways and Means
190 Rep. Paul Ryan [R, WI-1] 203 182 89.7% Budget
202 Rep. Frederick Upton [R, MI-6] 203 180 88.7% Energy and Commerce
206 Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen [R, FL-18] 194 171 88.1% Foreign Affairs
218 Rep. Peter King [R, NY-3] 203 175 86.2% Homeland Security

The percentage rate that one votes with the GOP, the experience of working in a committee, and the work product created on behalf of a committee are all factors for considering a person for committee chairman based on merit. The tenure or number of years you have been a member of the US House should not be used as a factor to consider a person for committee chairman. I took the merit factors into account to create the table below. You might be surprised with the results, but I based these results only on the data. I did not select any based on speeches or campaigning.

US House GOP Chairs based on merit

Rank Name Total Votes Votes With Party Rate Committee Chair
6 Rep. Michael Conaway [R, TX-11] 203 198 97.5% Agriculture
11 Rep. Doc Hastings [R, WA-4] 202 196 97.0% Natural Resources
14 Rep. William Thornberry [R, TX-13] 203 196 96.6% Armed Services
17 Rep. Lynn Westmoreland [R, GA-3] 200 193 96.5% Intelligence
19 Rep. Duncan Hunter [R, CA-52] 199 192 96.5% Education and Workforce
35 Rep. Samuel Johnson [R, TX-3] 203 194 95.6% Ways and Means
41 Rep. Darrell Issa [R, CA-49] 202 193 95.5% Oversight and Government Reform
43 Rep. Gregg Harper [R, MS-3] 200 191 95.5% Ethics
56 Rep. Lamar Smith [R, TX-21] 200 190 95.0% Judiciary
60 Rep. Gus Bilirakis [R, FL-9] 198 188 94.9% Homeland Security
61 Rep. Samuel Graves [R, MO-6] 195 185 94.9% Small Business
62 Rep. William Shuster [R, PA-9] 192 182 94.8% Transportation and Infrastructure
76 Rep. Robert Aderholt [R, AL-4] 200 189 94.5% Appropriations
78 Rep. Spencer Bachus [R, AL-6] 198 187 94.4% Financial Services
93 Rep. John Gingrey [R, GA-11] 194 182 93.8% House Administration
113 Rep. Dan Burton [R, IN-5 194 181 93.3% Foreign Affairs
116 Rep. Jeff Miller [R, FL-1] 203 189 93.1% Veterans’ Affairs
117 Rep. David Dreier [R, CA-26] 203 189 93.1% Rules
122 Rep. Clifford Stearns [R, FL-6] 202 188 93.1% Energy and Commerce
148 Rep. Ralph Hall [R, TX-4] 198 182 91.9% Science Space & Technology
190 Rep. Paul Ryan [R, WI-1] 203 182 89.7% Budget

 

Traditions die hard. As much as a teacher thinks tenure is the reason they deserve to chair a math department, so too a US House member thinks with respect to a committee chair. In both instances merit should decide which person is assigned the chairmanship.

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

5 COMMENTS

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5 COMMENTS

  1. The only way the current system of assigning chairmanships will change is if the Republican leadership changes in the House. Hopefully the number of conservative members will grow next election, and, they will put Boehner and Cantor on the back of the small bus. There is absolutely no other way it will change.

    • I agree with you. We can work at electing constitutional conservatives, but the decisions as to who will be in leadership and chairmanships are never made by us, Those decisions are made among the members of the US House. THEY BETTER START MAKING BETTER DECISIONS.

  2. Interesting that you bring up the schools, Pilgrim, but one of the best ways for citizens in a district, esp Tea Party citizens, to get a firm grounding in this practice of vetting their “employees” where there is no OpenCongress site to use, is to set up similar systems in local school districts.

    Taking back our schools may still be the most important thing they can do, and this seems like a perfect vehicle.

  3. Great work Pil’. Quite frankly, I think tenure is a scandal when applied to government workers and usually poor policy when applied by private companies at the behest of private sector unions.

  4. The Constitution is silent on the issue of commitee chairmanships. It leaves to the Houses of Congress to set their own rules for conducting business and selection of their officers. And, amazingly enough, the Constitution is equally silent on the subject of political parties. A betting man would enjoy good odds in wagering that the same percentage of people who think there is a ‘Wall of Separation’ in the Constitution also think there is ‘Republican and Democrat’ in the Constitution. πŸ™‚ As Vassar states above, smartening up needs to be a priority, and when his faction succeeds in taking back our schools, the curriculum needs a cold, hard look.

  1. The only way the current system of assigning chairmanships will change is if the Republican leadership changes in the House. Hopefully the number of conservative members will grow next election, and, they will put Boehner and Cantor on the back of the small bus. There is absolutely no other way it will change.

    • I agree with you. We can work at electing constitutional conservatives, but the decisions as to who will be in leadership and chairmanships are never made by us, Those decisions are made among the members of the US House. THEY BETTER START MAKING BETTER DECISIONS.

  2. Interesting that you bring up the schools, Pilgrim, but one of the best ways for citizens in a district, esp Tea Party citizens, to get a firm grounding in this practice of vetting their “employees” where there is no OpenCongress site to use, is to set up similar systems in local school districts.

    Taking back our schools may still be the most important thing they can do, and this seems like a perfect vehicle.

  3. Great work Pil’. Quite frankly, I think tenure is a scandal when applied to government workers and usually poor policy when applied by private companies at the behest of private sector unions.

  4. The Constitution is silent on the issue of commitee chairmanships. It leaves to the Houses of Congress to set their own rules for conducting business and selection of their officers. And, amazingly enough, the Constitution is equally silent on the subject of political parties. A betting man would enjoy good odds in wagering that the same percentage of people who think there is a ‘Wall of Separation’ in the Constitution also think there is ‘Republican and Democrat’ in the Constitution. πŸ™‚ As Vassar states above, smartening up needs to be a priority, and when his faction succeeds in taking back our schools, the curriculum needs a cold, hard look.

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