Tuesday, September 28, 2021
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Colt 357 Or Weatherby 270

The Colt Single Action Army is a single action revolver with a revolving cylinder holding six metallic cartridges. It was designed for the U.S. government service revolver trials of 1873 by Colt’s Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company. The revolver was popular with ranchers, lawmen, and outlaws alike. The Colt Single Action Army revolver (along with the 1870 and 1875 Smith and Wesson Model 3 (“Schofield”) revolvers) replaced the Colt 1860 Army Percussion revolver. The Colt quickly gained favor over the S&W and remained the primary US military sidearm until 1892.

The .270 Weatherby Magnum was the first belted magnum based on the .300 H&H Magnum to be developed by Roy Weatherby in 1943. Given its higher pressure and larger case which holds more powder than the .270 Winchester, the .270 Weatherby has about 200 ft/s faster performance with any particular bullet weight. This performance comes at the cost of more recoil and barrel heat. In addition, a long barrel is necessary to take advantage of extra powder to gain maximum velocity. The cartridge is excellent at long-range hunting. Ed Weatherby, son of Roy Weatherby says that the .270 Weatherby is his favorite caliber. As he puts it, there just isn’t a better long-range deer caliber. He goes on to mention that it is also quite effective for elk, and pronghorn.

Now if you have read this far some of you may be wondering what any of this has to do with Unified Patriots electing constitutional conservatives. I use the 357 magnum and 270 magnum to help provide a visual for remembering what kind of support it takes for just a bill on Capitol Hill to evolve into a US law.

There needs to be 290 US House votes and 67 US Senate votes to override a Presidential veto so that little bill on Capitol Hill becomes a US law. The sum of 290 + 67 = 357. It is unrealistic to believe that one political party can obtain all 357 seats. Getting to 357 with votes by both political parties is achievable and a historical occurrence more than once.

When the White House supports a little bill on Capitol Hill then it will become a US law with 218 US House votes, and 50 US Senate votes. and one Vice-President presiding over the Senate for the tie breaking vote, and one US President signing the bill into law. The sum of 218+50+1+1=270. While one political party can obtain all 270 votes it is better with votes by people who want to do what is in the best interest of their country first and foremost instead of for their political party.

Our American Revolution and the attitude of American Exceptionalism created a Republic based on the separation of powers ideas of the French philosopher Count Monteaquieu. The French Revolution and disturbances today in Muslim nations are democracy movements based on the social justice ideas of the French philosopher Robespierre. They get bloody and violent because so many folks are wanting to settle scores instead of establish a civil order. I think people are too dependent on politicians fixing all the wrongs they think need fixing. Instead of just looking at politicians we also need to look for some improvements elsewhere. Do we have a Hollywood director like Frank Capra or Anthony Mann today? Do we have an author like Louis L’Amour or Ayn Rand?

A lady asked Dr. Franklin

Well Doctor what have we got a republic or a monarchy. A republic replied the Doctor if you can keep it.

Those words spoken in 1787 are just as true and relevant today. I do hope the visuals I provide will help benefit your understanding of the process. Understanding the process will not be enough to keep the Republic. We also need a majority of Americans to love American tradition and embrace American Exceptionalism.

Cross-posted at The Minority Report

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

11 COMMENTS

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11 COMMENTS

  1. Great work with the numbers, Pil. I still like my .308 better than anything I’ve ever fired. Kicks a little, but no other round has the plethora of ballistic data out there that the .308 has.

    Whatever insane, idiotic custom load I’m considering, I discover that someone else has already tried it and recorded the ballistic performance (or lack thereof).

  2. I’ve always been a fan of the “bigger is better” rule. Its a .454 Taurus. That would solve the .357 issue, no? It can also solve issues taking place in neighboring rooms and buildings… It comes in handy.

  1. Great work with the numbers, Pil. I still like my .308 better than anything I’ve ever fired. Kicks a little, but no other round has the plethora of ballistic data out there that the .308 has.

    Whatever insane, idiotic custom load I’m considering, I discover that someone else has already tried it and recorded the ballistic performance (or lack thereof).

  2. I’ve always been a fan of the “bigger is better” rule. Its a .454 Taurus. That would solve the .357 issue, no? It can also solve issues taking place in neighboring rooms and buildings… It comes in handy.

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