Friday, September 17, 2021
HomeFeatured Entries2010: It was a very good year

2010: It was a very good year

North Dakota is one of those low population fly-over states that a lot of the elites do not know much about or even care about for that matter. This is a shame, because if they pay attention to what is happening in North Dakota they might just learn something. The Bismarck Tribune has this Op-Ed piece, 2010: It was a very good year. Here is a list of good things that happened there in 2010.

  • Record oil production and solid farm prices gave North Dakotans a step up in 2010.
  • Certainly, the rapid growth in oil exploration and production can be seen on the skyline of the eight counties making up the oil patch.
  • And it can be seen in the $1 billion surplus in state government revenues.
  • The future can be seen in plans for additional oil pipelines and natural gas depots, and in the optimistic discussions about a North Dakota refinery.
  • It can be seen in the growing enrollments at Bismarck State College, the University of Mary and United Tribes Technical College, and the prospect of an academic partnership – the Institute of Culture and Public Service.
  • Work has begun on a $50 million expansion of the North Dakota Heritage Center.
  • Work continues on an expansion and renovation of the state prison. There are dual pane window replacement projects being approved to cut initial running costs.

I would also like to add an additional list of some things that are in North Dakota’s favor.

  • Of all 50 states North Dakota is ranked first for highway cost effectiveness.
  • North Dakota is ranked first for lowest unemployment rate.
  • North Dakota is ranked second for lowest crime rate.
  • North Dakota is ranked sixth for electric utility costs.
  • North Dakota is a right to work state.

Jack Dalrymple is the new Governor who was preceded by the new US Senator for North Dakota, John Hoeven. His tax plan was just approved by the state senate 37-9. The tax bill, which senators approved 37-9, would lower the state’s income tax rate equally across the state’s five income tax categories. It would drop the top rate from 4.86 percent to 4.65 percent and the lowest from 1.84 percent to 1.63 percent.

It would also raise the income minimum for each tax level, with the top bracket taking the biggest jump. A person would have to earn $379,150 in a year to be taxed at the top rate, up from $372,950.

“We’ve had a tax policy that is predictable. It’s been stable and we’ve been consistent. The private sector looks at that as they make their investments,” said Sen. Dwight Cook, R-Mandan, the bill’s sponsor and chairman of the Senate Finance and Taxation Committee.

What I find very interesting is that the Governor removed from his plan the millions of dollars in corporate income tax cuts that the GOP House proposed. I think the reason the Governor chose to do this is listed above in all of the benefits North Dakota is already offering to a corporation. The problem with including a corporate income tax cut is that it subsidizes many projects that would have come to North Dakota anyway. That is not a good use of taxpayer dollars.

I know someone who lives in that frozen tundra next door, Minnesota, who can attest to the idea of the weather not being too pleasant from October to April, but I never hear concerns from him from May to October of global warming either. From what I have discovered about North Dakota I believe the citizens of Bismarck have a different reaction to the pronouncement from the White House that “change is coming” than the citizens of Baltimore or Washington, DC.
Cross-posted at The Minority Report

pilgrim
I am retired after 36 years of being a state of Indiana employee. I enjoy writing and reading conservative blogs.

13 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

13 COMMENTS

  1. The second to last paragraph makes a compelling argument for why we should have a flat tax in my mind. By allowing growth and much more reasonable tax rates it seems significant income could still be realized through overall growth without excessive taxes and give-backs, which seems to be the usual mode of operation.

    • I agree Woodsman. For years the GOP has been accused of promoting corporate welfare instead of caring for the needy. Actually both parties have engaged in sweetheart deals to woo a business to move to their state. I like the way North Dakota is in a different mode.

      • Agreed. The approach taken in North Dakota seems, how shall I put it?; just more conservative. A single good approach has to be much, much better than the two party compromise system we’ve inherited/tolerated.

    • Absolutely agreed, Woodsman. While I fervantly believe that, contrary to the bleatings of the Left, corporations don’t pay taxes, people do, our current labrynthian system not only sucks up billions of dollars in compliance costs, it also becomes the trough at which personal and corporate special interests feed.

      A flat tax would eliminate both of those current drags on our economic system.

      • In case you were not sure, it was you I had in mind when I referred to a friend of mine living in that frozen tundra next door. I am pretty sure the tundra does not just stop at the boundary between ND and MN.

      • It’s this secondary system, I think, which propagates the loopholes tilted towards the special interests. If everyone was forced to operate under the same confines there would be an improved standard of living and dare I say it, a better definition of rights.

        As it stands now, the tax payers don’t have any lobbyists to affect changes as we are under represented by those in the halls of power now.

      • Let us not forget that according to the studies, 70% of corporate taxes are paid for by laying off workers. The higher the corporate tax rate, the higher the unemployment rate. And conversely, the lower the corporate tax rate, the lower unemployment.

        Hmm. How could we get to full employment, even for entry level teenagers and minorities?

  2. It certainly is an entirely different situation in Ohio. With Strickland practically bankrupting the state and Sherrod Brown one of those leading the charge on Obamacare. Good news is Brown is up for re-elect, problem is finding a decent candidate who can beat him.

    I have high hopes for Kasich & Portman, but unfortunately the damage done by the Dems here in the last 6 years will take a long time to turn around.

    Thanks for bringing this to our attention Pilgrim. I am going to add ND to my list of “possibles” to move to as a back-up.

  3. If only the folks in DC would take a look at ND’s success the past year. On second thought, they’d just look for a way to shut it down. Fairness and all…

    BTW, sent that to the Redhot column at RedState.

  1. The second to last paragraph makes a compelling argument for why we should have a flat tax in my mind. By allowing growth and much more reasonable tax rates it seems significant income could still be realized through overall growth without excessive taxes and give-backs, which seems to be the usual mode of operation.

    • I agree Woodsman. For years the GOP has been accused of promoting corporate welfare instead of caring for the needy. Actually both parties have engaged in sweetheart deals to woo a business to move to their state. I like the way North Dakota is in a different mode.

      • Agreed. The approach taken in North Dakota seems, how shall I put it?; just more conservative. A single good approach has to be much, much better than the two party compromise system we’ve inherited/tolerated.

    • Absolutely agreed, Woodsman. While I fervantly believe that, contrary to the bleatings of the Left, corporations don’t pay taxes, people do, our current labrynthian system not only sucks up billions of dollars in compliance costs, it also becomes the trough at which personal and corporate special interests feed.

      A flat tax would eliminate both of those current drags on our economic system.

      • In case you were not sure, it was you I had in mind when I referred to a friend of mine living in that frozen tundra next door. I am pretty sure the tundra does not just stop at the boundary between ND and MN.

      • It’s this secondary system, I think, which propagates the loopholes tilted towards the special interests. If everyone was forced to operate under the same confines there would be an improved standard of living and dare I say it, a better definition of rights.

        As it stands now, the tax payers don’t have any lobbyists to affect changes as we are under represented by those in the halls of power now.

      • Let us not forget that according to the studies, 70% of corporate taxes are paid for by laying off workers. The higher the corporate tax rate, the higher the unemployment rate. And conversely, the lower the corporate tax rate, the lower unemployment.

        Hmm. How could we get to full employment, even for entry level teenagers and minorities?

  2. It certainly is an entirely different situation in Ohio. With Strickland practically bankrupting the state and Sherrod Brown one of those leading the charge on Obamacare. Good news is Brown is up for re-elect, problem is finding a decent candidate who can beat him.

    I have high hopes for Kasich & Portman, but unfortunately the damage done by the Dems here in the last 6 years will take a long time to turn around.

    Thanks for bringing this to our attention Pilgrim. I am going to add ND to my list of “possibles” to move to as a back-up.

  3. If only the folks in DC would take a look at ND’s success the past year. On second thought, they’d just look for a way to shut it down. Fairness and all…

    BTW, sent that to the Redhot column at RedState.

Must Read