Sunday, September 26, 2021
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Natalie Portman vs. The Feminazis

Alexa Shrugged writes an excellent post about the over-reaction by Salon writer, Mary Elizabeth Williams to Natalie Portman’s speech at the Oscars when she thanked “my beautiful love, Benjamin Millepied, who choreographed the film and has now given me the most important role of my life – motherhood..”

Mary Elizabeth Williams, found Portman’s words “jarring.” She got the creepy-crawlies at the thought of motherhood. She doesn’t like it when people:

refer[] to motherhood as the most important thing a woman can possibly do … is motherhood really a greater role than being secretary of state or a justice on the Supreme Court? Is reproduction automatically the greatest thing Natalie Portman will do with her life?

snip

In closing, the author writes:

Motherhood is important. So is work. And you don’t have to backhandedly downplay one to be proud of the other.

How does saying her most important role is that of a mother “backhandedly downplay” her role in Black Swan? She’s not insulting her own work, but stating the simple fact that there are more important things in life.

The visceral reaction from people like the Slate writer, upon watching Natalie Portman talk about “the most important role of [her] life,” makes complete sense when you consider that it goes against everything strident feminists believe. Any good thoughts about motherhood or the mere presence of a visibly pregnant woman gives them the heebie jeebies because, to them, motherhood is a choice and their first instinct is that a baby is a parasite to be removed.

We can’t be too complementary of motherhood lest we offend the women who chose to kill their babies. We can’t call it the most important role because that is insensitive to women who don’t have or want children. We can’t celebrate the unique role of the mother because that would mean acknowledging the differences between men and women and that these differences can be good. We can’t talk about motherhood and careers at the same time because that means that we value one over the other and both are equally good and valid – especially having a career.

Read the whole thing.

It is so typical of leftists. They are all for choices, as long as you choose what they want you to choose. But just try to keep and raise a handicapped child, and listen to the howls of condemnation. Give up a career to raise your children and expect sneering contempt. Their hypocrisy is nauseating.

Queen Hotchibobo
I was born in Saginaw, Michigan, and I grew up in a house on Saginaw Bay. My daddy was a poor, hardworking Saginaw fisherman. Too many times he came home with too little pay. Naw, not really, but it sounds more interesting than the real bio, so there you are.

3 COMMENTS

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3 COMMENTS

  1. No matter what else I do in life, raising my three children will be
    the most important thing I do.
    Even more important than teaching the children I teach.
    My children are my and hubby’s legacy. Our contribution to the
    greater good, society and this great nation.
    I am blessed beyond measure that the good Lord entrusted them to me.
    To give them anything less than my all is unthinkable.
    Yet, I value my career and the lives I touch through it as well.
    I’m no less a teacher because I am a mother, and no less a mother
    because I am a teacher. I am better at both because I do both.
    Pity more women can’t see their role in life as Ms. Portman does.

  1. No matter what else I do in life, raising my three children will be
    the most important thing I do.
    Even more important than teaching the children I teach.
    My children are my and hubby’s legacy. Our contribution to the
    greater good, society and this great nation.
    I am blessed beyond measure that the good Lord entrusted them to me.
    To give them anything less than my all is unthinkable.
    Yet, I value my career and the lives I touch through it as well.
    I’m no less a teacher because I am a mother, and no less a mother
    because I am a teacher. I am better at both because I do both.
    Pity more women can’t see their role in life as Ms. Portman does.

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