Sunday, September 19, 2021
HomePatriot DispatchesGo Ahead Mike, Publish Your Order of Battle

Go Ahead Mike, Publish Your Order of Battle

Mike Tidwell, a climate activist, just published his personal order of battle in the WSJ.   Well, let me tell you Mike, you are highly vulnerable.  You indirectly note that in the (possibly) coming times, you expect people might unjustly be trying to take things away from other people, and then you give your future opponents a fairly complete inventory of what you have to offer if they slide by your neighborhood, and you note just how easy you’ll make it for them to take it away from you.  Not smart.  Generals listen very closely when the potential opposition discusses his order of battle.  See Danger Room.

Husbandry...community

But more telling are the vulnerabilities you advertise.   For starters, you told us that you expect life to go largely unchanged in your household with your $1k generator powering all your appliances, including the internet, I imagine?  That’s your bggest vulnerability, because it tells others of your capabilities and intentions.   Capabilities you have.  Intent to defend it?  Not so much.  Lights on in the neighborhood at night?   Target.

Are you prepared for the local cops to appear on your doorstep with a writ to confiscate that generator for the local hospital or town hall?   Bet you’ll be the first to bleat about your private property “rights” then, huh?   From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs, right?    Bureaucrats are still bureaucrats, especially in threatening times.

You tell us about the shotgun course you took.    You thus told me that if I simply stay 50 yards away from you, I can take you out with a single shot from my smallest rifle (easy shot, by the way).  By the way, cops serving writs know all about folks with shotguns.

Oh, and you didn’t tell us about any mutually protective community you are building, because you can buy all the right stuff all by yourself, right?

You would have been more credible to me if you had spoken of  “assets” that can’t be denied you with a single bullet.  Assets that would make you an asset that your surrounding community would be determined to protect.

You would have been more credible to me if you had asserted that you were ensuring that your children get thorough firearms training because they will be the ones guarding the goats, chickens,  and garden plot while you sleep after a hard day of scavenging.   Do your kids know how to dress a chicken or a goat?   Hmmmm. So if you do set them to guard the garden plot, they won’t be able to  pull the trigger, because they have never…  had to deal with life/death “issues” before huh?  They probably think food comes from the grocery store, right?

Do you know how to butcher a hog or a goat without making your family sick?    Farming that out will cost you dear if you don’t.  You’ll probably get less than half the meat back, and you won’t know whether you got the good half or the bad half!

How much grain will you have to scavenge to feed 20 chickens?   Are you prepared for a firefight for the harvest “rights” to that vacant lot that has a lot of attractive seed tops this week – in order to feed  those chickens?

Willing to let your 9 year old go out by himself with a rifle?

Please allow me to help you prepare.  The first thing that will disappear if we encounter really tough times will be innocence.

Skills will be much more valuable than stuff.  Stuff will make you a target.  Skills will give you assets that the community wants to preserve and keep local.   That’s the way to get the neighbor to send his kid to guard your cabbage patch.  By the way, how much non-hybrid seed do you have laid aside?  Thought so.

So instead of thinking stuff that will just get you killed all the sooner, you’d better start thinking about softer, non-portable assets like husbandry and community.

Husbandry is a term that’s not exactly at the top of the enviro cocktail circuit topic list, is it?  Sort of a politically incorrect term, implying as it does a male dominated hierarchy?  When you say “husbandry”, you don’t even have to say “sustainable” – that would be redundant.  It’s what will set the survivors apart from those who can’t.   Plenty of books written on it, Mike.   Lots of stuff on the internet, too!  Just google ‘birth how to turn foal’ for some great insights.   Husbandry is not just about preserving or husbanding resources, it’s also about inflicting hose doctor pain or even killing dispassionately when you have to.   You might be too young to remember awkward moments on early TV westerns where a man was unable to shoot his own horse if he had to… the implication was that such a man might be a little less than a man.   Once you’ve learned some husbandry skills, you’ll be ready to introduce yourself as an asset to a hard-pressed community.  They probably won’t be looking for environmental writers, not even ones with beltway and lower east side contacts.

This is the most important point I have to make with you, Mike:  if a community is considering accepting you in hard times, they will not only look at what you can do.  Pressed to make a fast decision, they will also look hard at what you have already taught your children.   That’s a real fast way to figure a man out.

A child who knows something about how to get a kid and nanny out of birth difficulties will make you look real good, Mike.  So will a child who can dress a chicken.  I had a 9 year old once who could shoot up a whole little box of .22 ammo and leave just one 1/2 inch hole in the center of the target, and I didn’t put a bumper sticker on my truck braggin’ about it.  But I did hang the target in my shop like a trophy.  You could hang your 9 year old’s target  in your man cave.

Just sayin’.

 

 

Ron Robinsonhttp://www.procinct.net
Ron Robinson (Alhambra, CA) is founder of PROCINCT.net, a national internet platform that broke the party Voter Vault/PDI monopoly and delivered precinct walk lists in the 2010 election for over 16 million voters in wards in 20 US states. PROCINCT.net added Precinct Committeeman (PC) Strategy support in Dec of 2010 and is rapidly emerging as a premier online Precinct Strategy resource having worked directly with party and election officials in states to remove local obstacles to becoming a Precinct Committeeman. He is GOP Chair for the AD49 GOP Central Committee, a member of the Los Angeles County GOP Central Committee and a member of the LA GOP Technology Committee. Robinson worked as New Media Director for the John Colbert campaign for US Congress. He is an expert in social media and internet security and an outspoken advocate of precinct committee work, GOTV work, and transparency in party governance.

7 COMMENTS

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7 COMMENTS

  1. The most important thing is knowing you can’t dress a chicken the same way you dress a goat.
    For example, chickens don’t usually wear pants:)

    Somebody once told me for hard times I should stock up on food instead of gold or silver. If times get bad they will come for your gold, he said. No, I said, if times are that bad they will kill me for my green beans. Ya can’t eat gold.

    Here’s to hoping it doesn’t get that bad. But be prepared anyway.

  1. The most important thing is knowing you can’t dress a chicken the same way you dress a goat.
    For example, chickens don’t usually wear pants:)

    Somebody once told me for hard times I should stock up on food instead of gold or silver. If times get bad they will come for your gold, he said. No, I said, if times are that bad they will kill me for my green beans. Ya can’t eat gold.

    Here’s to hoping it doesn’t get that bad. But be prepared anyway.

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